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    #1

    You write this?

    Hello. I've noticed that native speakers very often drop auxiliary verbs when asking questions.
    e.g. You do something wrong? You write this?

    My question is whether I could ask the same questions using the past tense of the verb as in:
    You did something wrong?
    You wrote this?
    Many thanks

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    #2

    Re: You write this?

    You can do this in conversation if you indicate it's a question by speaking with a rising inflection. It's a casual register which you may want to avoid unless you feel really confident in English.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: You write this?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    You can do this in conversation if you indicate it's a question by speaking with a rising inflection. It's a casual register which you may want to avoid unless you feel really confident in English.
    Thanks for your quick reply. But did you mean You write this? or You wrote this?

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    #4

    Re: You write this?

    Sorry for the ambiguity. In casual English you can say or write You wrote this? or You did something wrong? instead of Did you write this? or Did you do something wrong?

    In spoken English the rising inflection of the non-inverted sentences will tell other people that you're asking a question. If you don't get the inflection right, you might offend or confuse the person you're speaking to.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You write this?

    I think the past tense rising inflection question is far more common than the present tense with "did" omitted.

    You wrote this?
    You made this dinner?
    He cleaned the kitchen without being asked?
    You're coming here after you stop at your dad's?
    You'll be home by 5?

    You use this to express a bit of surprise or to ask for confirmation of what you believe to be true. These are very common.

    The form with the omitted "did" and the present tense is less common. As Goes said, it can sound a bit aggressive without the right intonation.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: You write this?

    It could always be slurred, if not omitted, in casual conversation.

    "D'you write this?" might sound like "You write this?"

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: You write this?

    You'll hear both in colloquial English. "You write this?" is the full question minus the auxiliary "Did". "You wrote this?" is what some people say using a statement as a question, indicating that it's a question but using the rising inflection at the end.

    Edit: Apologies for duplication of answers. When I wrote mine, I could only see up to post #3.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: You write this?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    It could always be slurred, if not omitted, in casual conversation.

    "D'you write this?" might sound like "You write this?"
    It becomes so small/slurred that it is hard to notice when it disappears.

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