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    #1

    The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fire.

    (1)The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse once exposed to fire.
    (2)The synthetic material of windbreakers may melt once exposed to fire.
    (3)The synthetic material of windbreakers may melt down once exposed to fire.

    Could anyone please tell me which sentence above is correct? What's the difference between the verb of fuse, melt, and melt down?
    Thanks for your help!

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    #2

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Is this a homework question?

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    #3

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Is this a homework question?
    First, this is not a homework question. Second, as I said before, I am not kind of bored to ask you guys to do homework for me. Every question I asked is what I really want to figure out and learn well. The three sentences which I typed above are originally part from one of the handouts my teacher gave. But, I personally extend it into the three sentences because I want to know which verb is OK to put into such a sentence. Last, could you please never question my intention to ask here? I just want to know which sentence or usage is correct for you English native speakers. Thank you very much!

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Have you referred to their definitions in a dictionary?
    It seems to me that only one of them fits your sentence.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Quote Originally Posted by z7655431 View Post
    could you please never question my intention to ask here?
    The moderators are here to moderate, z7. Thanks to them we are spared the spam, porn, drivel, cheating, etc, that ruin so many forums. Accepting what may, very occasionally appear to be over-zealous is a small price to pay for that. None of us has the right to ask that moderators accept us for what we claim to be without question. In my six or so years on forums, I have encountered many trolls who claim not to be trolls, cheats who claim not to be cheats spammers .., etc.

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    #6

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    ...could you please never question my intention to ask here?
    We will question your intention to ask here as much as we like.

    Now that you mention it, I have a vague recollection of reading your explanation before, but do not intend to search your past threads to find it.

    Your post certainly looks like a homework question, and for us to give a direct answer would give other students the idea that this is a free homework service.

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    #7

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Have you referred to their definitions in a dictionary?
    It seems to me that only one of them fits your sentence.
    My teacher said "melt" is correct here, and "fuse" is incorrect. But, I think "fuse" is OK. E.g. Lead fuses at quite a low temperature. (Longman) So, what's your answer on this?

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    #8

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    We will question your intention to ask here as much as we like.

    Now that you mention it, I have a vague recollection of reading your explanation before, but do not intend to search your past threads to find it.

    Your post certainly looks like a homework question, and for us to give a direct answer would give other students the idea that this is a free homework service.
    I'm sorry to post such a question that makes you feel it's homework. Please allow me to revise my question.
    The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse once exposed to fire. (I myself wrote this sentence, but my teacher said the fuse here is wrong.)
    The synthetic material of windbreakers may melt once exposed to fire. (My teacher said it should be "melt".)
    The synthetic material of windbreakers may melt down once exposed to fire. (But, when I looked up those words in dictionaries, I still found the phrasal verb of melt down)
    ---So, I've checked those words in many dictionaries, but I am still very confused. I want an English native speaker to tell me which verb is proper here.

    Is it OK that I posted it like this? Actually, the reason why I posted questions so concisely is that I don't want any time of waste for you to read those explanations that could be without. If I don't type those words in quotes, I think the English question will be much easier and concise for you to read and answer. Because you can just give me an answer and briefly explain the difference between those words. But, if I post this question with so many superfluous words just like those in quotes, will you think this is good? I know time and efficiency are important for you all and me. I just want to make you and me much more efficient on this. However, if you all think that the completeness of a question is extremely important, I surely will follow this in the future.

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    #9

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Quote Originally Posted by z7655431 View Post
    My teacher said "melt" is correct here, and "fuse" is incorrect. But, I think "fuse" is OK. E.g. Lead fuses at quite a low temperature. (Longman) So, what's your answer on this?
    I agree with your teacher because windbreakers are not metal, which lead is.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 04-Mar-2016 at 13:43. Reason: Fixing a typo.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: The synthetic material of windbreakers may fuse/melt/melt down once exposed to fi

    Your teacher is right, "melt" is the only correct verb in that sentence.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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