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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #1

    like John, I didn't have a lot to do, but..

    1) Like John, I didn't have a lot to do, but my salary was low.

    2) Like John, I didn't have a lot to do, but I didn't get paid a lot.

    3) Like John, I didn't have a lot to do, but I also didn't get paid a lot.
    4) Like John, I didn't have a lot to do, but I didn't get paid a lot either.

    Aren't these sentences ambiguous?

    Can one tell if John gets paid a lot (has a high salary) or not?

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,309
    #2

    Re: like John, I didn't have a lot to do, but..

    In a general sense, the 'but' indicates a difference between your situation and John's. This would indicate that John's salary was higher than yours.

    #3. and #4. don't sound particularly natural. I prefer #1.
    I am not a teacher

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