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    #1

    Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    According to the Longman Dictionary, "very" is incorrect here. It should be "absolutely".

    Do not say 'very delighted'. Say
    absolutely delighted. (See it here: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/delighted) (Longman)

    However, is it really incorrect to say "very delighted"? Thank you!

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    I don't agree with that, I'm afraid.
    I don't see a problem with "very delighted."

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    I find "very delighted" unnatural. If you want to say that a person is more than delighted, use another adjective; "ecstatic" perhaps, (a bit "over the top", though). I think that "delighted" is fine for most situations.
    ďEvery miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.Ē

    ó Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #4

    Re: Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.






    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Z7655431:

    I think that I know the "problem."

    In older books, "delighted" is considered to be only the past tense and past participle of the verb "delight" (A verbal form)

    Thus, one should not use "very," for "very" is an adverb that one needs to use in front of an adjective ("very nice") or an adverb ("very quickly").

    In modern English, however, many people consider "delighted" to also be an adjective.

    Therefore, most Americans, in my opinion, would NOT think twice if you said, "I am very delighted to hear the news about your job promotion."

    IF you want to follow an old rule, however, it is considered "excellent" English if you say or write:

    "I am very much delighted to hear ...." (The adverb "much" -- according to the old rule -- is needed after "very" and in front of the verbal form "delighted."

    I copied this from a letter published in an American newspaper. It was written by a non-American diplomat: "I am very much confused ...."



    Credit for this information goes to George Oliver Curme, A Grammar of the English Language (1931), Vol. II, page 150.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    I would find "very delighted" unnatural on the basis that "delighted" means "very pleased", so I see no reason to effectively repeat "very".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    Note that the Parser's citation is from a book published eighty-five years ago. Its author was trying to discourage a usage which was already common then and is now completely normal. Delighted is a perfectly good adjective.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Sandy will be very/absolutely delighted to see you.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would find "very delighted" unnatural on the basis that "delighted" means "very pleased", so I see no reason to effectively repeat "very".
    I find 'very delighted' unnatural because it feels unnatural.

    I think the most fitting adverb to use, if you want to stress the state of delightednesss, is 'highly'.
    I am not a teacher

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