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  1. #1
    megafunc is offline Newbie
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    How to use the word 'pace'

    Hello everyone,

    I'm currently having some trouble trying to understand the word 'pace'. I encounter this word quite often, but I can't really make out the exact meaning that the word 'pace' is trying to express in the different examples.

    1- On for a change of pace...
    2- They set off at a leisurely pace.
    3- He quickened his pace, having little reason to prolong the trip.

    Could anyone clarify the exact meaning of 'pace' used in these sentences and give me some details? I would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Piscean is online now VIP Member
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    Definitions 3 and 4 here seems to fit.

  3. #3
    megafunc is offline Newbie
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    Still, I don't quite understand.

    Could you please be so nice to point out each meaning of the word "pace" used in every sentence I mentioned in details?

  4. #4
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    The sentences in question:

    1- On for a change of pace...
    2- They set off at a leisurely pace.
    3- He quickened his pace, having little reason to prolong the trip.

    Sentences 2 and 3 use "pace" in one of its literal meanings: the speed with which someone moves, particularly when walking.

    Sentence 1 uses a metaphorical meaning. A "change of pace" is a shift in subject matter, especially into or away from considering details. For example, a lecture might start with an overall discussion illustrating how the subject fits into a wider area of inquiry; it could then "change pace" by delving into the details.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    Pace = rate of speed.

    - a rapid pace
    - a slow pace
    - a leisurely pace
    - a breakneck pace

    The expression "change of pace" is an idiom. It's a switch to something different. For example, if you listened to jazz all day long, you might switch to opera in the evening for a change of pace.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  6. #6
    Lazz is offline Newbie
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    Quote Originally Posted by megafunc View Post
    I can't really make out the exact meaning that the word 'pace' is trying to express in the different examples.

    1- On for a change of pace...
    2- They set off at a leisurely pace.
    3- He quickened his pace, having little reason to prolong the trip.

    Could anyone clarify the exact meaning of 'pace' used in these sentences and give me some details? I would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    When walking, each step that we take is "a pace" (and so, in days of yore, also commonly used as a rough measure of distance - e.g. two hundred paces). If we were out for a stroll, I imagine our pace would be liesurely. If we were in a rush and wished to speed our progress, then we would likely quicken our pace. A change of pace, therefore, would prosaically describe a variation in our style of step - fast or slow or even hop skip and jump - and has come to serve ably in other fields of performance other than walking, as Charlie Bernstein says (above), to describe a different direction in whatever that might be. It seems to often have relevance in fields of entertainment and education.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazz View Post
    If we were out for a stroll, I imagine our pace would be liesurely.
    Lei​surely.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. #8
    Lazz is offline Newbie
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Lei​surely.
    Thank you.

  9. #9
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: How to use the word 'pace'

    megafunc, I have only just become aware of this thread for some reason. I have moved it from Literature to Ask a Teacher, where it more properly belongs.

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