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    #1

    sound aow

    Please expain to me how to produce the sound aow as used in various dialects (scottish, cockney). As ow should be pronounced as [au] like in cow, can I say that aow would a+au or something is wrong. Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: sound aow

    Can you give us an example of a word which uses the sound you're describing?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: sound aow

    I refer to a rule taken from the internet "The 'ow' sound in words like 'cow' becomes an 'aow.' This is one of the classic Scottish sounds.
    Art thou going down to the town?".

    I can't understand this rule. Thank you.

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    #4

    Re: sound aow

    Did you have a chance to look into my questions? Thank you very much.

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    #5

    Re: sound aow

    I'm not an expert on pronunciation but for most English people, the "ow" in "town", when said in a stereotypical Scottish accent, sounds like "oo".

    "This is my town" sounds like "This is my toon".

    I've been racking my brain trying to come up with a similar sound in a classic Cockney accent (the other accent mentioned in post #1) but I can't.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: sound aow

    Isn't a drawn-out exclamation sounding vaguely like a-ow part of the burlesque version of Cockney English?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: sound aow

    Is it what you're are talking about?


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    #8

    Re: sound aow

    Can I admit that "a-ow part" resembles (more or less) the ow sound which in turn is oo sound for most of English people. Thank you.

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    #9

    Re: sound aow

    Isn't classic Cockney likely to say tarn for town?

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    #10

    Re: sound aow

    I am still confused about the following rule in the context of the Scottish pronunciation. One site says that ow becomes aow. (for instance, in a cow). The other rule (taken from a Scottish pronunciation book) does that "[au] (which is the transcribed sound of cow) moves toward [u]". How do those rules or explanation correspond to each other? Meanwhile (might be I am mistaken) but I hear the diphthong ou(o+u) on the record relating by the author to the second rule. Can somebody clarify this? What is the exact transcription of aow. Thank very much.


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