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    #1

    Compared to

    Greeting experts! Wish you have a good health!

    It's me again, and as usual I have a question relating to grammar.

    I think we are all familiar with the term "compared to", but here I do not talk about it as normal past tense verb placed right after a subject, but after a comma - in the end of a phrase. We see this most when writing essays about data, diagrams, like in Task 1 of the IELTS test. My first though was that it is a reduced relative clause, but it does not seem right. (still think it is some kind of shortened form though )

    This is an example:

    "...By 2009, the percentage of Internet users was highest in Canada. Almost 100% of Canadians used the Internet, compared to about 80% of Americans and only 40% of Mexicans."
    Another one is:

    "Blue is better compared to green."

    A guy explained by giving the full sentence: "Blue is better (when it is) compared to green (by me)." This is the closest I can get, but it still does not seem fit when you... compare the two example

    So far I still have not figured it out what it truly is and have failed miserably in searching online, for the results are all about "compared to vs compared with", etc. So please, help me answer this. If this happens to be too obvious (hope not), don't criticize me. I'm stupid

    Well, that's all. Thank you and have a good day!

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Compared to

    I am having trouble understanding your question. Your first example compares Internet users in Canada to Internet users in the USA. It's pretty straightforward. It's uncomplicated. I don't understand your second example. (How do you compare blue to green?)

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    #3

    Re: Compared to

    Quote Originally Posted by Creamcake View Post






    I'm stupid

    NOT A TEACHER


    Hello, Creamcake:

    No, you are NOT. But I AM!

    Therefore, after having done some googling, I have some ideas (NOT "answers").

    1. I believe that we are NOT dealing with a relative/adjective clause.

    2. If anything, it seems to be some kind of reduced adverbial clause.

    3. The English helpline Grammaring claims that when a past participle starts a sentence, it is a shorter way to say a passive sentence. Congratulations! That seems to be what you are saying, too.

    a. That website says that "Shocked by the explosion, the people ran for shelter" is a shorter way to say "The people were shocked by the explosion and ran for shelter."

    4. For easier analysis, may I simplify and rearrange your sentence as:

    "Compared to 80% of Americans, 100% of Canadians use the Internet."

    5. If I understand my Google sources correctly, that sentence seems to be a short version of something like:

    "100% of Canadians use the Internet, (as it is) compared with 80% of Americans."

    *****

    A sentence from the English helpline englishforums (January, 2006): "Many people believe that cicadas live for a short period of time, but they actually live a long life, as (it is) compared with other insects." One expert there said that he personally would not use "as it is."

    A sentence from the English helpline grammarexchange (February, 2004): "In 1976, nearly 40 percent of the United States population attended a movie once a week, as/when compared to 20 percent in 2000." An expert there felt that "as" (not "when") was better in that context. The expert felt that "when" would be used only if the writer were asking the reader to do the comparing. The expert felt that "as" is more appropriate in reporting statistics.

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    #4

    Re: Compared to

    You are a true help as usual. Your explanation is indeed also very detailed. I cannot express how grateful I am. Thank you!

    You may or may not believe it, but I have thought about this as something relating to 'passive'. The problem was that I was not able to expand it to its true form.

    I just have one more think that needs to be a little bit more clear. In your example you add the phrase "as it is" to make to full sentence, I wonder what IT represents here, the whole phrase before the comma or a specific part of it?

    I do recognize there are short versions of sentences, but so far I have only understood the reduced relative clause. Other types of reduction relating to adverbial clauses or passive sentences or even more, I have no idea about. For example, I still sense a blurred connection between the participle phrase and relative clauses and adverbial clauses, but my head go nuts every time I try to clear it. If you could enlighten me on the tangled issue above, I would be highly appreciated. I will open a new thread if that's necessary.

    Anyway, I thank you for all your effort to help me!

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    #5

    Re: Compared to

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Creamcake:

    I have found something that you can consider as one more piece of the puzzle.

    "As compared with the last season, there is an improvement in the catch of whales."

    NOTES:

    1. That sentence comes from a great scholar's masterpiece. ***

    2. According to him, "as compared with" is a preposition in that sentence.

    3. His book was published in 1931, so apparently by then, some people were parsing the combination "as compared with" as a preposition.

    4. Yes, I agree with you: You might get more results if you start a new thread regarding participial phrases. Be sure to give the members some example sentences.

    5. I do NOT have the confidence to guess what "it" means in "as it is compared." Hopefully, someone who knows grammar better than I will give us the answer.

    6. If YOU find some more information about how to analyze "compared to/with," please let US know.



    *** George Oliver Curme, A Grammar of the English Language (1931), Vol. II, page 300.

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