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    #1

    present perfect continuous

    Over 1.000 employees have been working at ABC so far and this number grows continually.

    Is it possible to use present perfect continuous with "so far"?

    Thank you.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: present perfect continuous

    Your sentence is ungrammatical and it is unclear what you are trying to say. Do you mean that 1000 employees are currently working at ABC, or do you mean that since its inception, ABC has employed a total of 1000 people (not necessarily at the same time)?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: present perfect continuous

    I mean that since its inception, ABC has employed a total of 1000 people (not necessarily at the same time) and it keeps on employing new people. That's why I say that they (employees) are continuously grow in number.
    How will my sentence sound then?

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    #4

    Re: present perfect continuous

    To date, 1000 people have worked at ABC and that number continues to rise.
    Since [date of inception], ABC has employed 1000 people and employment levels continue to rise.

    I have tried to give two alternatives for your sentence. There's a potential ambiguity in the conclusion we might make from the figures. Just because they continue to employ more people, that doesn't mean that the total number of people working there at any one time is going up. Let's say the company was recently set up and they immediately employed 500 people to work there. Yesterday, 20 people resigned and 20 new people started work there. The total number of current employees hasn't changed (500) but you can now say that since its inception, the company has employed 520 people.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: present perfect continuous

    emsr2d2, thank you for the detailed answer.

    I have one more question: If I want to indicate a certain number of people or size of a territory, should I use dot marks (.) in these figures?
    For example: It offers over 25(.)000 items for trucks, trailers, semitrailers and sells its products to more than 1(.)000 customers in more than 30 countries.

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    #6

    Re: present perfect continuous

    No. Use either a comma or nothing.

    I have 25,000 trucks for sale.
    There are 1000 customers on our database.

    I prefer the version with the comma, especially with bigger numbers.

    1,000
    10,000
    110,000,000
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: present perfect continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by Ksenia View Post
    Is it possible to use present perfect continuous with "so far"?
    Yes, it is; but not in the sentence in the original post.

    For example,
    I adopted a cat last month. So far, I've been feeding her leftovers, and she seems happy enough with that.

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    #8

    Re: present perfect continuous

    emsr2d2, if I am writing different amounts of money, how then I should use dots and commas?

    They transferred to our account 12.875,46 EUR.
    Have you received the money of 1.928,37 EUR?

    Is that correct?
    Last edited by Ksenia; 22-Mar-2016 at 13:58.

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    #9

    Re: present perfect continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by Ksenia View Post
    emsr2d2, if I am writing different amounts of money, how then I should use dots and commas?

    They transferred to our account 12.875,46 EUR.
    Have you received the money of 1.928,37 EUR.

    Is that correct?
    They transferred €12,875.46 to our account. (That's twelve thousand, eight hundred and seventy-five Euros, and forty-six cents. I don't know if that's what you meant.)
    Have you received the €1,928.37? (That's one thousand, nine hundred and twenty-eight Euros, and thirty-seven cents. I don't know if that's what you mean.)

    We put the symbol for the currency before the numbers (12, €45, $212). However, that's not necessarily the case in the whole of Europe. The reason that most British people put the symbol first is because that's what we do with our own currency. I understand that in Germany, they tend to put the € symbol after the numbers because they follow the old system where they would have written "12 DM" (Deutschmarks).

    For British currency, put a dot between pounds and pence (1.12). For European currency (Euros), put a comma between the Euros and the cents (€45,66).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: present perfect continuous

    I think you should follow English-language practice when writing numbers in English: use commas to separate groups of three digits left of the decimal, use a period (full stop) as the decimal mark, and put the currency symbol to the left of the number, without a space.

    For example, €23,456.78.
    I am not a teacher.

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