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    #1

    be a moment

    Hi,

    ''Wait for me here. I'll only be a moment.''

    I have come across the above sentence in the book Right Word Wrong Word by L.G. Alexander (page 122) and would like to ask if it is supposed to be 'in a moment' rather than 'a moment' or not.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: be a moment

    No — 'I'll only be in a moment' doesn't make sense.

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    #3

    Re: be a moment

    Thanks for the answer but I cannot understand why it makes no sense. Is 'be a moment' an idiom? I am asking that of you because in the dictionary (http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/moment), we can see the entry 'in a moment.'

    In a moment (=very soon): I'll come back to that point in a moment.

    What's the difference between the two?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: be a moment

    In "I'll comeback to that point in a moment" "in a moment" means "very soon". In ''Wait for me here. I'll only be a moment", "a moment" refers to a period of time.
    Like "I"ll only be a minute".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

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    #5

    Re: be a moment

    I won't be a moment is an idiom in BrE meaning "I'll be there in a moment." It's rarely if ever used in AmE. A similar idiom which is used both in British and American English is I won't be long or don't be long, meaning "I will be finished soon" and "Be finished soon" respectively.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: be a moment

    You're more likely to hear "just be a minute" or "just a sec(ond)" in AmE, but "be a moment" is completely understandable.

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