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    #1

    The show is a sellout for three months.

    The show is a sellout for three months. (Xu Zhenzhang, a famous English teacher in Taiwan)

    Is the tense in the above sentence acceptable?
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The show is a sellout for three months.

    As long as "The show is a sellout" refers to the current state of affairs with ticket sales and "for three months" refers to three months which haven't happened yet, it's OK. It's not the most elegant way of saying it though. I would probably say "This show is a sellout for its entire three-month run" or something similar.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: The show is a sellout for three months.

    It could also be supposed to mean "The show has been a sellout for three months" (for the last three months, and ongoing).

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    #4

    Re: The show is a sellout for three months.

    Sitifan, do you know the intended meaning? I also see the ambiguity that Raymott has pointed out. It is not a very clear sentence.

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    #5

    Re: The show is a sellout for three months.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Sitifan, do you know the intended meaning? I also see the ambiguity that Raymott has pointed out. It is not a very clear sentence.
    The original sentence was an isolated example sentence. There was no context. So I don't know what the writer intended to mean.
    Last edited by sitifan; 27-Mar-2016 at 12:33.
    I need native speakers' help.

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