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    #1

    there are a lot of affordable set meals available for you to choose from at quite ...

    On such a romantic Valentine’s Day, there are a lot of affordable set meals available for you to choose from at quite a few restaurants.
    →Is this sentence correct and good? My teacher said it is too wordy and the phrase “at quite a few restaurants” is too far away from “set meals”, which is not good. Do you English native speakers have the same feeling? Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: there are a lot of affordable set meals available for you to choose from at quite

    On such a romantic Valentine's Day means that the Valentine's Day in question is more romantic than other Valentine's Days. It would be more logical to write On a day as romantic as Valentine's Day....

    I think your teacher is trying to nudge you towards writing in the active voice. Try rephrasing the sentence to make quite a few restaurants the subject.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: there are a lot of affordable set meals available for you to choose from at quite

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    On such a romantic Valentine's Day means that the Valentine's Day in question is more romantic than other Valentine's Days. It would be more logical to write On a day as romantic as Valentine's Day....

    I think your teacher is trying to nudge you towards writing in the active voice. Try rephrasing the sentence to make quite a few restaurants the subject.
    In fact, there's a sentence (Today is White Day.) before the sentence I gave.
    I tried to rephrase the sentences. The following are two versions of this sentence. Could anyone help me to check it?
    (1)Today is White Day. On such a romantic day, many restaurants promote a large number of affordable meals for you to choose from.
    (2)Today is White Day. On such a romantic day, there're a lot of affordable meals for you to choose from at quite a few restaurants.
    →Are the two sentences correct and good? I heard a native speaker said that "set meals" is odd. (So I deleted set.) Really?

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    #4

    Re: there are a lot of affordable set meals available for you to choose from at quite

    The term set meal does not appear on American menus. I was a little perplexed to see items like breakfast set on English-language menus in Japan. Eventually I realized it means "breakfast combination."

    You sentence 1, using the active voice, is concise. "Promote" isn't a very natural verb choice though; try "offer".

    Note that the active voice uses fewer words and puts the actor ("many restaurants" in your sentence) in a prominent position. Sometimes the passive voice is a good choice, but you should always consider the active voice. (Can you see how I used passive and active in the previous sentence?)
    I am not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: there are a lot of affordable set meals available for you to choose from at quite

    I'm not familiar with "Breakfast set" but we generally order either "a la carte" (a full range of starters, main courses and desserts, from which we can pick as many or as few as we like) or from a "set menu". Occasionally, this has absolutely no choice at all, just listing one starter, one main, one dessert and a price for all three, or, more commonly, perhaps two or three choices for each course. The "set" part of it is the price. You can't choose to just pay for one course, or even two - you pay the price for all three even if you choose not to eat them all. There is usually a 2-course set menu (starter and main) and a 3-course set menu (starter, main and dessert).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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