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  1. mazurowski93's Avatar
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    #1

    Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    Hello everyone,

    I'd be appreciated if any of you could provide me with an answer if 'cram with', 'clutter with', and 'pack with' mean the same. I am studying prepositions and prepositional phrases and some of them are confusing to me. My native language is Polish, and in translation every of them mean the same, but still I have some doubts.

    Anyway, thanks for any help.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    Please write full sentences containing each one and we can comment. Also note that your opening should be "I would appreciate it if ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. mazurowski93's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    First of all, thank you for your note.
    In the book where I found these collocations, there is only examplary sentence with 'clutter with', and it is:
    "The room was cluttered with boxes."
    And these are examples of two more (I found them in the net):
    - "He crammed his drawer with his socks."
    - "This book is packed with useful information."

    After some research, it seems that 'clutter with' refers to the slob activity, without taking care of order. Am I right?
    But still I don't know if I can use them interchangeably, especially 'cram with', and 'pack with'.

    Once again, thanks for help.

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    #4

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    In these examples, "crammed" and "packed" are very similar, though "crammed" may give a greater sense of force being used to stuff the items into place.

    "cluttered" gives more of a sense of disorder (like "strewn").
    Translator, editor and TESOL certificate holder, but not a teacher. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    In your example sentence "cluttered" is not a verb. You could argue that "cluttered" describes the room.

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    #6

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    Quote Originally Posted by mazurowski93 View Post
    In the book where I found these collocations, there is only one sample (not "exemplary") examplary sentence....
    Note the correct spelling of "exemplary" above. However, that was not the word you wanted. Exemplary​ means "first-rate", not "an example of".
    I am not a teacher.

  5. mazurowski93's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    In your example sentence "cluttered" is not a verb. You could argue that "cluttered" describes the room.
    Chapter in the book is devoted to verbs followed by prepositions, so I think it is a verb, and sentence is in passive voice. But of course, you are also right, that "cluttered" can be understood as a word used for description of the room.

    Thank you for your notes and help.

  6. engee30's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    Although the meaning of that passive sentence is purely stative, clutter is still a verb in there, a transitive one. The agent is realised as the prepositional phrase with boxes.
    Changed to the active, the sentence reads as follows:
    Boxes cluttered the room.
    Obviously, it would have taken somebody to clutter the room with boxes, in which case the verb would be dynamic.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Difference between clutter with, cram with, and pack with

    'Clutter' is used when there is too much useless junk filling up a space that people could otherwise use. A room or house is an obvious object of cluttering. A woman's handbag can be cluttered with so many things, she can't find her lipstick, for example. 'Clutter' is the more marked verb (the most different one). Clutter is a negative term.

    'Packed' and 'crammed' often mean the same. There are positive uses. "This food is packed with vitamins". 'Packed' is actually a neutral word. You can pack something neatly, and it's neither cluttered nor crammed. 'Crammed' means packed too densely.

    Naturally there are other nuances that can't all be summarized.

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