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    #1

    Jeff in a T-shirt

    Which of these sentences are correct:

    1) Jeff in a T-shirt looks cool, but Jeff in a suit looks uptight.

    2) Jeff, in a T-shirt, looks cool, but Jeff, in a suit, looks uptight.
    3) Jeff, in a T-shirt, looks cool, but the same Jeff, in a suit, looks uptight.
    4) Jeff, in a T-shirt, looks cool. But in a suit he looks uptight.

    5) Jeff-in-a-T-shirt looks cool, but Jeff-in-a-suit looks uptight.



    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Jeff in a T-shirt

    Is this an exercise in artificially moving words around to make unnatural sentences? I see no need for anything other than "Jeff looks cool in a T-shirt but uptight in a suit".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Jeff in a T-shirt

    Thank you very much, Emsr2d2,

    It is a kind of a test. I am trying to figure out if proper nouns can be postmodified that way. If we could define two 'Jeff's. One who is in a suit and one who is in a T-shirt. I was just curious to know if it could be done.

    If I say
    A) Jeff at the office is tall, but Jeff at the gym is short.

    I think the meaning would be that there are two Jeffs.

    I think the same idea could be expressed with:

    B) The Jeff at the office is tall, but the Jeff at the gym is short.

    Now I wanted to see if there was a way to do the same thing if there was only one 'Jeff'. Two different 'states' of the same Jeff.

    It was probably a long shot. But I do sometimes experiment with language (even with my own).

    Gratefully.
    Navi.

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