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    #1

    Verb "loom"

    I have tried to use "loom" in my sentences. Would you please correct my mistakes?

    1. As John reached the ridge, the sparkling sea loomed in front of him; its bright light hurt his eyes.
    2. We walked to the end of the road, and suddenly, a dazzling white mansion loomed in front of us.
    3. The driver stopped the bus, and we saw the city looming before us with its myriad of lights and rivers of traffic moving in all directions.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Verb "loom"

    I wouldn't use "loom" in those examples.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: Verb "loom"

    I am wondering which other verbs would be suitable in the above examples.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Verb "loom"

    1. "appeared" works.
    2. "We walked to the end of the road, and there in front of us was a dazzling white mansion."
    3. If you can see "rivers of traffic moving in all directions", you must be seeing the city from above and it would be "laid out before you" rather than "looming in front of you".
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 27-Mar-2016 at 13:06.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #5

    Re: Verb "loom"

    "loom" means to approach in a threatening manner, from the perspective of the one being approached.
    Translator, editor and TESOL certificate holder, but not a teacher. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Verb "loom"

    Not necessarily, bubbha:

    loom


    verb (intransitive)


    • to come into view indistinctly with an enlarged and often threatening aspect
    • (of an event) to seem ominously close
    • (often followed by over) (of large objects) to dominate or overhang

    http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/loom



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    #7

    Re: Verb "loom"

    Poor eyesight means I have to get my face pretty close to a computer screen before I can read it. If I have to get uncomfortably close to someone to read their screen, I often apologize by saying "Sorry for looming." This is an intentional misuse of the word to defuse a slightly uncomfortable situation.
    I am not a teacher.

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