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    #1

    concepts of theirs as a frontier society

    Does " concepts of theirs as a frontier society or of what their founding fathers stood for; and the British to a peculiar sense of innate national superiority" mean " concepts of theirs that deem their countries are more advanced a society or of what their founding fathers stood for; and the British people cling to a peculiar sense of innate national superiority"

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    Thus, the Japanese are united by, among other things, a belief in their ethnichomogeneity that defies the variety of facial shapes and skin colours visibleon even a short stroll along a crowded Tokyo street. Many Americans,especially conservatives, cling to outdated or strangely distorted concepts oftheirs as a frontier society or of what their founding fathers stood for; andthe British to a peculiar sense of innate national superiority based ongeographic separation from the rest of Europe, a lingering imperial nostalgiaand a victory in the Second World War that would have been unachievablewithout massive US and Soviet involvement.

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    #2

    Re: concepts of theirs as a frontier society

    Here's the quote with missing spaces inserted:

    Many Americans, especially conservatives, cling to outdated or strangely distorted concepts of theirs as a frontier society or of what their founding fathers stood for; and the British to a peculiar sense of innate national superiority based on geographic separation from the rest of Europe, a lingering imperial nostalgia and a victory in the Second World War that would have been unachievable without massive US and Soviet involvement.

    This is a long, challenging sentence. Try breaking it down into shorter bits and removing parenthetical clauses and some of the adjectives:

    Many Americans cling to outdated or strangely distorted concepts of theirs as a frontier society. ("Theirs" means "their society"; "frontier society" refers to the effects that expanding into the Western frontier had on American culture.)

    The clause after the semicolon refers back to the first clause. Where it says ...and the British to a peculiar sense of innate national superiority, it means The British cling to a sense of superiority. The following clauses list two more things the author thinks give the British a sense of superiority: imperial nostalgia (nostalgia for their lost empire) and their victory in WWII.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: concepts of theirs as a frontier society

    The map shows that the Western frontier of US is the Pacific Ocean. So the expanding happened long before?

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    #4

    Re: concepts of theirs as a frontier society

    In 19th-century America, frontier meant the unorganized territory claimed by the United States but occupied by native Americans and American settlers, who could take ownership of land by legally claiming it, building a dwelling, and farming. The "wild West" portrayed in old movies is another name for the frontier. The "closing of the frontier" announced after the 1890 census is said to be a key moment in US history, as the nation began adjusting to a society from which dissatisfied people could no longer strike out for a new beginning.

    The old meaning persists to a significant extent in AmE, so we tend to avoid using it as a synonym for international border.
    I am not a teacher.

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