Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #1

    The dominance of conclusions over arguments

    The dominance of conclusions over arguments is most pronounced where emotions are involved. The psychologist Paul Slovic has proposed a theory in which people let their likes and dislikes determine their beliefs about the world. Your political ①preference determines the arguments that you find compelling. If you like the current health policy, you believe its benefits are substantial and its costs ②more manageable than the costs of alternatives. If you are a hawk in your attitude toward other nations, you probably think they are relatively weak and likely to ③submit to your country’s will. If you are a dove, you probably think they are strong and will not be easily persuaded. Your emotional attitude to such things as red meat, nuclear power, tattoos, or motorcycles ④follows your beliefs about their benefits and their risks. If you ⑤dislike any of these things, you probably believe that its risks are high and its benefits negligible.
    ==============================
    What does the underlined mean? Does it mean "conclusion can be more easily made when emotions are involved, emotions can affect conclusions greatly?"


  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,868
    #2

    Re: The dominance of conclusions over arguments

    It means that people who involve their emotions in their thinking tend to allow their (pre-conceived) conclusions to dominate any arguments which might go against their pre-conceptions. It suggests that if you allow your emotions to get involved when thinking about something, you are less likely to hear/understand (or be swayed by) other arguments.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. no fixed conclusions about a so-called
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2015, 10:41
  2. Conclusions, proposals... doubtful?
    By Tedwonny in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-Aug-2014, 04:36
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2009, 02:36
  4. draw or come to conclusions?
    By jctgf in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2008, 01:24
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-Feb-2006, 05:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •