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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Smile What does “for not being bigger” mean here?

    I am reading a book about Tim Walker called Pictures and got quite confused when I read this part, Here is the context:

    So here then are the truths of that Vogue picture from 1947: It was staged by a German émigré painter, whose accent rendered him only partially intelligible in his adopted country; the hawk was not, strictly speaking, native to the United Kingdom and certainly not to London; the portrait was taken by an American on secondment to England, who did not care about painters or painting (Clifford Coffin cared even less about the British landscape, once observed haranguing the standing stones of Stonehenge for not being bigger). Despite appearances, there’s little ‘English’ about it at all, just the suggestion of it. How potent for one photographer suggestion can be.
    I've got 2 questions:
    1, Was Clifford Coffin being observed haranguing or Clifford Coffin observed someone else haranguing..?
    2, What does “for not being bigger” mean here? to prove himself is not big, being compared to the Stonehenge? or it's saying the Stonehenge is not big..? does it have a pun here..."a bigger person" or sth?


    Thanks a lot.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What does “for not being bigger” mean here?

    1. He was observed by someone haranguing the stones at Stonehenge.
    2. He thought that the stones should be bigger.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: What does “for not being bigger” mean here?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    1. He was observed by someone haranguing the stones at Stonehenge.
    2. He thought that the stones should be bigger.
    thank you very much for answering me! :)
    but how can I know the word FOR is used for the object, i.e. stones here, but not for the subject, which is Clifford Coffin in this case.

    Like in this sentence: The winner of the Miss Transgender UK pageant was stripped of her crown for not being “full-time” transgender, the organiser has claimed.

    Here FOR is obviously after Miss Transgender, and it means: stripping of the crown FOR Miss Transgender NOT BEING full time transgender.
    We are clear that the FOR is not after crown(object) this time.

    Looks the structure of the latter case is same with the former one, then how should I understand next time if another situation?

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What does “for not being bigger” mean here?

    In a sentence like that, you need to tell from the context. Since Stonehenge is not responsible for the size of the man, that reading is unlikely. Sometimes, you'll just get an ambiguous sentence, and you're on your own.
    "The crown was taken from Miss Transgender for not being shiny enough."

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: What does “for not being bigger” mean here?

    I thought English structure is always quite clear and tells everything in a strict way, but... apparently we still need a context to see, thank you!

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What does “for not being bigger” mean here?

    We almost always need a context. That's why we keep asking for one here.

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