Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 417
    #1

    What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    Is there a difference between "again and again" and "over and over again"?
    Are they interchangeable?

    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,830
    #2

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    You have been on this forum for long enough (under two usernames) to know that we require full sentences in order to give our opinion.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 417
    #3

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You have been on this forum for long enough (under two usernames) to know that we require full sentences in order to give our opinion.
    I don't know if I can use the first username anymore, it doesn't work anymore, this is the only one I have now.

    Most of the questions I ask are not from any source but what I have heard in movies, on TV, talk shows. So when I feel for example if two phrases have similar meanings I feel the need to know if they are different in any way or if they are interchangeable.

    Now, I do construct my own sentences but you know I am not very good at punctuation, I do get confused with those comma splices. However, one of the moderators gave me a link to read about it, I am still confused to use them.

    John had proposed Alexandra on many occasions over and over again, but Alexandra felt indifferent.
    John had proposed Alexandra on many occasions again and again, but Alexandra felt indifferent.

    Now in this one the first one sounds more natural to me.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    They mean the same to me. I'd put that phrase before "on many occasions", not after it.

    "John proposed to Alexandra."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,285
    #5

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    John had proposed Alexandra on many occasions over and over again, but Alexandra felt indifferent.
    John had proposed Alexandra on many occasions again and again, but Alexandra felt indifferent.
    John has to propose to Alexandra.

    On many occasions is redundant in both sentences. Just leave it out.
    I am not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 417
    #6

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    John has to propose to Alexandra.

    On many occasions is redundant in both sentences. Just leave it out.
    Yeah, using "on many occasions" with "over and over again" sounds like repetition, so "on many occasions" should be left out. Another new thing I learned from Raymott's and your post is that we should use the preposition "to" after "proposed".
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 31-Mar-2016 at 19:00. Reason: Remove unnecessary bold and hyperlink

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 11,017
    #7

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    Say:

    John had proposed to Alexandra on many occasions.

    OR

    John had proposed to Alexandra many times.

    If you insist upon using "over and over" you don't need to use "again" with it. Also, saying he did it over and over makes it seem like he did it on Monday and Tuesday and then and then again on Wednesday.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 1,741
    #8

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    I agree with Tarheel here in that neither phrase you mention adds much to your sentence. Many times or on many occasions would be enough.

    My feeling about the phrases, though, is that over and over again has only negative connotation and is likely to suggest a sense of tedium or exasperation whereas again and again could imply excitement.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Urdu
      • Home Country:
      • Pakistan
      • Current Location:
      • Pakistan

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 417
    #9

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Say:

    If you insist upon using "over and over" you don't need to use "again" with it. Also, saying he did it over and over makes it seem like he did it on Monday and Tuesday and then and then again on Wednesday.
    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I

    My feeling about the phrases, though, is that over and over again has only negative connotation and is likely to suggest a sense of tedium or exasperation whereas again and again could imply excitement.
    This is exactly what I was looking for the difference between "over and over again" and "again and again". And jutfrank the additional information you provided is indeed very very helpful thank you very much for sharing your valuable thoughts, they are much appreciated.

    There is another thing that has come to my mind just as brother Tarheel has suggested "many times" or "on many occasions" are interchangeable. Now I have also heard "many a times". Can you guys elaborate a little bit on "many a times"? Now, is it colloquial or standard? And is it different from "many times"?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,462
    #10

    Re: What is the difference between over and over again and again and again?

    The idiom 'many a time' (not 'times') means 'on many occasions' or 'many times'.

    idiom

    many a time
    again and again; frequently.
    (Collins)

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Is there any difference between...
    By loufa in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-May-2012, 14:48
  2. not much difference/not a lot of difference ?
    By ph2004 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Nov-2009, 07:17
  3. tell me the difference
    By abdelaz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Sep-2008, 12:35
  4. [Idiom] the difference between the No.2 and second
    By kevin_von in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-Sep-2008, 01:41
  5. Have you been / Have you ever been -Any difference?
    By greystroke in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2008, 12:21

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •