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  1. HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
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    #1

    Brookish?

    Hello,

    I am reading a review on a Korean adaptation of the famous Shakespearean play, the Tempest, and there are a couple of parts I do not quite understand.

    Here's the link to the entire text, in case more context is needed: http://www.theguardian.com/stage/201...tempest-review


    In fact the whole production, with its Brookish bamboo canes, Shakespearean plot and Korean music and dance, is an eloquent testament to the fusion of the best of east and west.
    What does "Brookish" even mean? I used OneLook dictionary search and only got one result from Urban Dictionary. Apparently the word could mean two things - thorough / exact / obsession to minute details or cool. Does any of the definitions fit the bill in this particular context? and why in capital letter? Is it maybe a cultural reference to something that involves a person named Brook?


    Another question... well, this one I think I kind of get it, but I want confirmations from the experts here.

    What instantly strikes one is the lightness and wit with which Oh Tae-Suk handles the familiar story. The Prospero-like King Zilzi, immersed in Taoist magic and exiled by a rival monarch, arranges the initial shipwreck partly out of revenge and partly because he believes it's high time his 15-year-old daughter "met somebody". And when the Miranda equivalent is asked by her kingly suitor if she is pure and true, she replies with heavy irony "this is a desert island".
    Am I correct in understanding that the suitor is asking if she is a virgin and the irony is that the woman has been living on a desert island for the better half of her life so there is no way for her to have known any men? Is it an irony in that the man is asking something so obvious it's one of those "Duh, can't you tell?" moments?

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    #2

    Re: Brookish?

    Shakespeare made a double entendre: the island has never been occupied, and neither has the Miranda character (so to speak).
    I am not a teacher.

  2. HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Brookish?

    !!!!!!
    O the epiphany...

    So that's how it is. When she said "this" is a desert island, she was also referring to herself.

    I see my understanding of the text was rather shallow. Thank you very much.
    Last edited by HaraKiriBlade; 31-Mar-2016 at 15:53.

  3. HaraKiriBlade's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Brookish?

    Does anyone have any clue about the 'Brookish' part? Maybe it's a UK-exclusive expression, seeing as how the text is from the Guardian?

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    #5

    Re: Brookish?

    Since the writer capitalized Brookish, I imagine the bamboo canes reminded them of something the director Peter Brook might have done.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 01-Apr-2016 at 17:38. Reason: To make Peter Brook's name singular.
    I am not a teacher.

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