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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
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      • Iran

    • Join Date: May 2010
    • Posts: 1,587
    #1

    senjed

    May I ask you what you call these? We call it 'senjed' which is a fruit put in 7-seen, traditionally decorated table for Norooz.

    Thanks,

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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      • English
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      • Australia
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      • Australia

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    #2

    Re: senjed

    Senjed (Elaeagnus angustifolia) (sometimes called: Persian olive, wild olive, Russian olive, silver berry, oleaster,) is a species of Elaeagnus, native to western and central Asia, Afghanistan, from southern Russia and Kazakhstan to Turkey and Iran.
    https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=senjed

    • Member Info
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      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
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    #3

    Re: senjed

    The tree is called Russian olive in the United States. It is much loathed as an invasive species, particularly by allergy-sufferers like me. Once intentionally imported, it is now banned in at least the US states of Colorado, New Mexico and Connecticut.

    It has pleasantly fragrant blooms, but its pollen is murder.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,397
    #4

    Re: senjed

    Interesting, I didn't realize they're considered nuisance trees, but then then in this area of so few trees, any tree is sacrosanct.

    They're commonly grown in my area, as they're drought-resistant and establish in almost any kind of soil. However, they never seem to bear fruit in this area, so perhaps that's why they don't spread on their own.

    I've never seen Russian Olive trees that weren't purposely planted, mostly as windbreaks. My uncle planted several in his orchard, but after 20 some years has yet to see a single fruit, although the trees themselves are thriving.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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