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    #1

    Which of the following titles best describes the content of the passage?

    Hi, I have 2 questions of the following reading which cannot understand the correct answer! I really appreciate if you spend your time and help me. Thanks a lot.

    Reading:
    In eighteenth-century France and England, reformers rallied around egalitarian ideals, but few reformers advocated higher education for women. Although the public decried women‟s lack of education, it did not encourage learning for its own sake for women. In spite of the general prejudice against learned women, there was one place where women could exhibit their erudition: the literary salon. Many writers have defined the woman‟s role in the salon as that of an intelligent hostess, but the salon had more than a social function for women. It was an informal university, too, where women exchanged ideas with educated persons, read their own works and heard those of others, and received and gave criticism.


    In the 1750‟s, when salons were firmly established in France, some English women, who called themselves “Bluestocking,” followed the example of the salonnieres (French salon hostesses) and formed their own salons. Most Bluestockings did not wish to mirror the salonnieres; they simply desired to adapt a proven formula to their own purpose—the elevation of women‟s status through moral and intellectual training. Differences in social orientation and background can account perhaps for differences in the nature of French and English salons. The French salon incorporated aristocratic attitudes that exalted courtly pleasure and emphasized artistic accomplishments. The English Bluestockings, originating from a more modest background, emphasized learning and work over pleasure. Accustomed to the regimented life of court circles, salonnieres tended toward formality in their salons. The English women, though somewhat puritanical, were more casual in their approach.


    At first, the Bluestockings did imitate the salonnieres by including men in their circles. However, as they gained cohesion, the Bluestockings came to regard themselves as a women‟s group and to possess a sense of female solidarity lacking in the salonnieres, who remained isolated from one another by the primacy each held in her own salon. In an atmosphere of mutual support, the Bluestockings went beyond the salon experience. They traveled, studied, worked, wrote for publication, and by their activities challenged the stereotype of the passive woman. Although the salonnieres were aware of sexual inequality, the narrow boundaries of their world kept their intellectual pursuits within conventional limits. Many salonnieres, in fact, camouflaged their nontraditional activities behind the role of hostess and deferred to men in public.


    Though the Bluestockings were trailblazers when compared with the salonnieres, they were not feminists. They were too traditional, too hemmed in by their generation to demand social and political rights. Nonetheless, in their desire for education, their willingness to go beyond the confines of the salon in pursuing their interests, and their championing of unity among women, the Bluestockings began the process of questioning women‟s role in society.


    21. The passage suggests that the Bluestockings might have had a more significant impact on society if it had not been for which of the following?
    (A) Competitiveness among their salons
    (B) Their emphasis on individualism
    (C) The limited scope of their activities
    (D) Their acceptance of the French salon as a model for their own salons
    (E) Their unwillingness to defy aggressively the conventions of their age

    Answer: The book says that the correct answer is E, but I think that C is correct and E is not.


    24. Which of the following titles best describes the content of the passage?
    (A) Eighteenth-Century Egalitarianism
    (B) Feminists of the Eighteenth Century
    (C) Eighteenth-Century Precursors of Feminism
    (D) Intellectual Life in the Eighteenth Century
    (E) Female Education Reform in the Eighteenth Century

    Answer:The book says that the correct answer is C, but I think that E is correct and C is not. They have no idea to be feminists, based on the passage.

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    #2

    Re: Which of the following titles best describes the content of the passage?

    21. is (E): "They were too traditional, too hemmed in by their generation to demand social and political rights."

    24. is (C): the text is about the Bluestockings. Look at the first sentence of each paragraph and find the subject.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Which of the following titles best describes the content of the passage?

    Quote Originally Posted by tesoke View Post
    Hi. I have two questions on the following reading, for which I cannot understand the correct answers! I would really appreciate it if you would spend some time and help me. Thanks a lot.



    Interesting! I'd never heard of the Bluestockings. Thank you for sharing it!

    I must say, this is an article that many English speakers would struggle to understand. If you got most of the questions right, you're good!

    I read the article and chose answers 21-E and 24-C. See my comments below.


    Reading:
    In eighteenth-century France and England, reformers rallied around egalitarian ideals, but few reformers advocated higher education for women. Although the public decried women‟s lack of education, it did not encourage learning for its own sake for women. In spite of the general prejudice against learned women, there was one place where women could exhibit their erudition: the literary salon. Many writers have defined the woman‟s role in the salon as that of an intelligent hostess, but the salon had more than a social function for women. It was an informal university, too, where women exchanged ideas with educated persons, read their own works and heard those of others, and received and gave criticism.


    In the 1750‟s, when salons were firmly established in France, some English women, who called themselves “Bluestocking,” followed the example of the salonnieres (French salon hostesses) and formed their own salons. Most Bluestockings did not wish to mirror the salonnieres; they simply desired to adapt a proven formula to their own purpose—the elevation of women‟s status through moral and intellectual training. Differences in social orientation and background can account perhaps for differences in the nature of French and English salons. The French salon incorporated aristocratic attitudes that exalted courtly pleasure and emphasized artistic accomplishments. The English Bluestockings, originating from a more modest background, emphasized learning and work over pleasure. Accustomed to the regimented life of court circles, salonnieres tended toward formality in their salons. The English women, though somewhat puritanical, were more casual in their approach.


    At first, the Bluestockings did imitate the salonnieres by including men in their circles. However, as they gained cohesion, the Bluestockings came to regard themselves as a women‟s group and to possess a sense of female solidarity lacking in the salonnieres, who remained isolated from one another by the primacy each held in her own salon. In an atmosphere of mutual support, the Bluestockings went beyond the salon experience. They traveled, studied, worked, wrote for publication, and by their activities challenged the stereotype of the passive woman. Although the salonnieres were aware of sexual inequality, the narrow boundaries of their world kept their intellectual pursuits within conventional limits. Many salonnieres, in fact, camouflaged their nontraditional activities behind the role of hostess and deferred to men in public.


    Though the Bluestockings were trailblazers when compared with the salonnieres, they were not feminists. They were too traditional, too hemmed in by their generation to demand social and political rights. Nonetheless, in their desire for education, their willingness to go beyond the confines of the salon in pursuing their interests, and their championing of unity among women, the Bluestockings began the process of questioning women‟s role in society.


    21. The passage suggests that the Bluestockings might have had a more significant impact on society if it had not been for which of the following?

    (A) Competitiveness among their salons The article says that the French solons were competitive, but the English salons were not.

    (B) Their emphasis on individualism
    This was not a topic of the article.

    (C) The limited scope of their activities
    You're right that their activities were limited. But the question is asking WHY they were limited.

    (D) Their acceptance of the French salon as a model for their own salons
    The article tells us why the English women did NOT accept the French model.

    (E)
    Their unwillingness to defy aggressively the conventions of their age - See the first highlighted blue line above. They were too "hemmed in" by the rules of their culture to challenge its customs.

    Answer: The book says that the correct answer is E, but I think that C is correct and E is not.

    C isn't wrong, but it doesn't answer the question. Does E make more sense now? Do you see how it fits?


    24. Which of the following titles best describes the content of the passage?

    (A) Eighteenth-Century Egalitarianism
    In the first paragraph, we learn that education reform for women was not a major demand of English egalitarians.

    (B) Feminists of the Eighteenth Century
    Later, it makes clear that the English feminist movement did't happen in the 1700s.

    (C) Eighteenth-Century Precursors of Feminism
    See the second highlighted blue line above. It summarizes the effect of the Bluestockings' role in the evolution of what would become feminism in England. If this doesn't make sense, look up the word precursor.

    (D) Intellectual Life in the Eighteenth Century
    This doesn't mention key points of the article: women, England, and salons.

    (E) Female Education Reform in the Eighteenth Century T
    he essay says in the first paragraph that women's education wasn't important to English reformers in the 1700s.

    Answer:The book says that the correct answer is C, but I think that E is correct and C is not. They have no idea to be feminists, based on the passage.

    You're right that the article says they were not feminists. But it also says that their interest in learning helped pave the way for the later feminist movement. And that seems to be the final point of the essay. So it would be good to say that in the title, right? Answer C does that.
    I hope that helps!
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 01-Apr-2016 at 20:01.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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