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    #1

    to drive at (a) high speed

    All the cars were driving at a high speed and drivers sometimes didn't stop for the traffic lights.
    →Is this sentence correct? Is the phrase "at a high speed" used correctly? I think it should be "at high speed" (without a). However, the interesting thing is that Ngram and Google gave me different answers on this.

    Please take a look at them:
    https://books.google.com/ngrams/grap...0speed%3B%2Cc0

    https://www.google.com.tw/search?esp....0.GaWQGXlNXG0

    https://www.google.com.tw/search?esp...82.KhDNoF-ci2o

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    #2

    Re: to drive at (a) high speed

    Driving at a high speed is natural in the context. At high speed works in most other contexts, so it's not surprising that the latter phrase is more common.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: to drive at (a) high speed

    At a high speed could refer to a single occasion.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to drive at (a) high speed

    Or to a particular speed.

    I would not use the indefinite article in the original sentence.
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    #5

    Re: to drive at (a) high speed

    This is how I understand the difference between high speed/a high speed:

    It can be dangerous to drive at high speed. (generally fast)
    For a motorist, 150 km/h is a high speed. (a specific speed, also fast)

    Perhaps I'm overthinking this, but the inclusion of the reference word a in the example sentence suggests to me that the writer is referring to a certain speed (or speed bracket) that he/she has in mind. It brings a sense of specificity. That's what articles do.

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