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    #1

    go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    1. Do you jog?
    2. Do you go for jogging?
    3. Do you go jogging?
    4. Do you go for a jog?
    5. Do you go to jog?


    Which of the above statements are grammatically correct?
    Which of the above statements are natural and more frequently used?

    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 04-Apr-2016 at 11:40. Reason: Removed formatting and bold to standardise font

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    #2

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    1. Do you jog?
    2. Do you go for jogging?
    3. Do you go jogging?
    4. Do you go for a jog? Unnatural though not entirely grammatically incorrect.
    5. Do you go to jog?


    Which of the above statements are grammatically correct?
    Which of the above statements are natural and more frequently used?

    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen
    See above. Note that they all refer to habitual actions, equating to "Are you a regular jogger?"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    4. could be quite natural in context.

    What do you do in the mornings? Do you go for a jog?

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    #4

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    Good point. I retract my statement that it's unnatural. However, Jutfrank's context still refers to habitual actions. I wasn't sure if the OP thought these questions could be used in place of "Are you going for a job?" or similar.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    4. could be quite natural in context.

    What do you do in the mornings? Do you go for a jog?
    It came to my mind because we do say "Do you go for a walk?"

    so if "go for a walk" sounds natural then why not "go for a jog"

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    #6

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    It came to my mind because we do say "Do you go for a walk?"

    so if "go for a walk" sounds natural then why not "go for a jog"
    Yes, we can go for a walk/run/jog/bike ride etc.

    In what context would you use "Do you go for a walk?"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Yes, we can go for a walk/run/jog/bike ride etc.

    In what context would you use "Do you go for a walk?"
    If I have a diabetic friend and doctors have asked him to walk at least one hour a day, I may ask him "Do you go for a walk", that can be the context.

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    #8

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    You'd need to add 'every day' for it to be natural.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 04-Apr-2016 at 19:49. Reason: typo

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    #9

    Re: go jogging/go for a jog/go to jog, etc.

    If you want to find out if he has already started walking for an hour a day, you could ask "So, after your doctor's advice, do you go for a walk every day?" It's grammatically correct although I would say "Are you going for a walk every day?" or "Have you started going for a walk every day?"

    (Cross-posted with Piscean)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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