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    #1

    Do you "bunk" your classes?

    Now, I don't know if you are familiar with this word "bunk". In fact, it is used very frequently both in Pakistan and India. It's origin is British but I guess the British no longer use it. It used to be a slang word in old British English but it is still in use as a slang word here both in Pakistan and India.

    If somebody says, "John bunked his chemistry class, yesterday."

    It means that John was at school/college/university but he was goofing around somewhere else when he was supposed to be taking the class.

    So when you are supposed to be in your class and you don't take it, rather you hang out with friends outside your classroom doing unnecessary things, like spending time in the canteen, gossiping with friends, using internet aimlessly at the computer lab and stuff like that.

    "John bunked his chemistry class and hung out with Stacy in the lawn."
    "Don't worry, I will bunk my English class and help you with the assignment"

    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen
    Last edited by Aamir Tariq; 05-Apr-2016 at 18:25.

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    #2

    Re: Do you "bunk" your classes?

    Slang is an uncountable noun. If you want to describe a term as slang, you have to write something like a slang word.

    We don't use the word bunk that way in AmE. American slackers may skip a class.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Do you "bunk" your classes?

    In BrE, when I was at school, we said "bunk off school/classes". We also used "skive off". I don't know what the youth of today say.

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/defin...rm=Bunking+Off
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Do you "bunk" your classes?

    Bunk" has a different meaning in American English. It's similar in meaning to "That's a crock!" or "That's BS".

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    #5

    Re: Do you "bunk" your classes?

    I just remembered that when I was in school, a synonym for skipping a class was to cut it. Look at that guy running out of the school. He's cutting class!
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Do you "bunk" your classes?

    I'd go with 'skip'. Kids used to "play hooky", but I haven't heard that for 40 years.
    You can always use the technical term "truant" (a noun that has been verbed). "His kids are always truanting. They are truants."

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    #7

    Re: Do you "bunk" your classes?

    Also (in the UK at least, though to be honest I haven't heard it said for decades): 'He is always playing truant'.

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