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    #1

    Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    Do you use "temperature" when you talk about "fever"?


    1. She is suffering from fever.
    2. She is having a fever/She is having fever. (Should we use indefinite article "a" here?)
    3. She has a fever.
    4. She has a temperature.


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    Aamir the Global Citizen

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    #2

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    Sentences 3 and 4 are common in AmE. The indefinite article is required. Please avoid she has a temperature, even though it's widely used. Even dead people have a temperature, though it tends to be the same as the ambient temperature.
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    #3

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Sentences 3 and 4 are common in AmE. The indefinite article is required. Please avoid she has a temperature, even though it's widely used. Even dead people have a temperature, though it tends to be the same as the ambient temperature.
    You said 3 and 4 were common. You also said indefinite article was required and then you asked me to avoid using "She has a temperature".

    So if I say "She has a temperature".
    So doesn't it mean she a fever or her surroundings have a high temperature because of which she is feeling hot/she is feeling the heat, is that what you meant to say? I am confused.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    You said 3 and 4 were common. You also said indefinite article was required and then you asked me to avoid using "She has a temperature".
    I am confused.
    So am I.

    I don't see anything wrong with, 'She has a temperature'. You can also use 'running' instead of 'has'.
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  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    People use "So and So has a temperature" to mean that person has a fever, but that annoys those of us who are picky about the words we use.

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    #6

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    'She has/is running a temperature' may be considered slightly informal at most. I still don't see anything wrong with it, in BrE that is.
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  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    I use "She has a temperature", not "She has a fever".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

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    #8

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    For me, 'She has a temperature' also means 'She's feverish'.

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    #9

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    So if I say "She has a temperature".
    So doesn't it mean she a fever or her surroundings have a high temperature because of which she is feeling hot/she is feeling the heat, is that what you meant to say? I am confused.
    I meant to say that pedants point out that everything has a temperature. It may be normal, above normal, or even equal to the ambient temperature. A person whose temperature is the same as the ambient temperature is dead unless it's quite a hot day.

    However, in common usage, to have a temperature means "to have a fever". Reading the British forum members' responses makes me think that to have a temperature may be more common in BrE than in AmE.
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  5. Skrej's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Do you use "temperature" when you mean "fever"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    You said 3 and 4 were common. You also said indefinite article was required and then you asked me to avoid using "She has a temperature".

    So if I say "She has a temperature".
    So doesn't it mean she a fever or her surroundings have a high temperature because of which she is feeling hot/she is feeling the heat, is that what you meant to say? I am confused.
    This is just GoesStation's personal pet peeve, not a standard rule.

    As others have said, I see no problem with the expression "has a temperature", and frequently use it myself as a speaker of AmE.

    It's clear from context that you mean "a higher than normal" temperature.
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