Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 1,509
    #1

    not to befit / become to do somehing =? to ill befit / become to do somehing

    Hello everybody!

    It does not befit the lion to answer the dogs.

    Does the main question "It does not befit the lion to answer the dogs" mean "It does not become the lion to answer the dogs"?

    I think so, but I prefer to ask you. In that case, (before checking with you about the meaning), I have arrived at a conclusion that both the sentences mean the same, namely, "It is not proper/suitable/ for the lion to answer the dogs".

    Can both the sentence mentioned above, namely "It does not befit the lion to answer the dogs" and "It does not become the lion to answer the dogs" be expressed as "It ill befits the lion to answer the dogs" and "It ill becomes the lion to answer the dogs"?

    Could you answer my questions and put me right where I am mistaken?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 964
    #2

    Re: not to befit / become to do somehing =? to ill befit / become to do somehing

    No mistakes. You have a good understanding of this usage.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #3

    Re: not to befit / become to do somehing =? to ill befit / become to do somehing

    Yes, it means something like that, as long as you're reading "become" in the right sense. 'Befit' - "be appropriate for, suit".
    Yes, your sentences with 'ill' are OK.
    'Befitting' is not exactly the same as 'becoming'. 'Befit' is more being appropriate. 'Become' means more 'suiting'. "A full, flowing mane becomes a lion".
    I don't think I ever use 'befit'.

Similar Threads

  1. "ill-educated" vs "ill-mannered"
    By LeTyan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 25-Mar-2014, 09:05
  2. [Vocabulary] ill logic or ill-logic instead of illogic
    By birdeen's call in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-Jun-2011, 11:01
  3. ill often/often ill ? 3 times a/per year ?
    By ph2004 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2010, 15:07
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Aug-2009, 18:54
  5. Inauspicious, ill-boding, ill-fated, ominous and unfortunate
    By Devil's tear in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-May-2008, 21:19

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •