Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #1

    head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    Second, living in an English-speaking country can make it possible to experience the local culture, acquiring English more quickly and deeply head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    The last part "head and ears not by mouth and ears." is intended to mean "your whole body can experience something, not limited parts.", but it sounds weird. What would be a correct form?

  2. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,955
    #2

    Re: head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    Was this written by a native speaker? Have you copied it correctly?

  3. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #3

    Re: head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    It was written by me, I'm sorry - I'm not a native speaker.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    It doesn't work. Besides, 'head' doesn't mean 'whole body'. Are you suggesting we learn language corporeally?
    I'd suggest starting again.

  5. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #5

    Re: head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    Yes, how do you say 'corporeally' in another way? 'In person' or 'with all your body'?

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,838
    #6

    Re: head and ears not by mouth and ears.

    You can experience something "with your whole body". However, in effect, we still learn a language with our eyes, ears and brain. People tend to pick up a language faster if they move to a country where that language is the native language, and if they make sure they don't spend all their time with people who speak their own language. There are one-week to one-month long "immersion courses" for foreign languages where the only language allowed is the one that participants are trying to learn. I suppose that "immersion" technique comes closest to your idea of "whole body" learning.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. perk up one's ears/prick up one's ears
    By tzfujimino in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29-Jan-2016, 18:54
  2. [Grammar] Ears
    By Jana1950 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Jun-2014, 17:21
  3. Rabbits have long ears/two ears
    By Winwin2011 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2012, 17:34
  4. up to your ears
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2009, 15:59
  5. ears
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-May-2008, 04:31

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •