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    #1

    put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by over

    Hello!

    I will repeat my question so that everything is clear.

    In case of verbs describing removal or putting on of clothes such as "put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweater/head, are they always followed by "over"?

    Just to illustrate, let's consider the following sentences.

    1. He usually puts a jacket on over his sweater in the winter. He usually puts a jacket on over his head in the winter.
    (It says that he adds a layer to his sweater). (It says how he puts a jacket on - over the head).
    He usually takes a jacket off in hot summer. He usually takes a jacket off over his head in hot summer.
    Does it mean that using "over" in item 1 is obligatory? I think so.

    2. Last night she slipped a jacket on over her sweater. Last night she slipped a jacket on over her head.
    (It says that she added a layer to her sweater). (It says how she put a jacket on quickly - over the head).
    Does it mean that using "over" in sentence 2 is obligatory? I think so.

    3. Because of unbearable heat, they removed their heavy woollen shirts over the head/their heads
    Does it mean that using "over" in sentence 2 is obligatory? I think so.

    So to sum up. Whether we remove our clothes from our bodies or we put them on / slip them on we do so over our heads.

    What do you think of my reasoning? Is it true. In case it is not the case, please put me right.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 09-Apr-2016 at 22:35. Reason: Removed formatting to reduce font size

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    1. He usually puts a jacket on over his head in the winter.
    (It says how he puts a jacket on - over the head).

    2.Last night she slipped a jacket on over her head.
    (It says how she put a jacket on quickly - over the head).
    If those mean anything, it's that they cover their heads with their jackets.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 09-Apr-2016 at 22:36. Reason: Reduced font size in quote

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    #3

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    No, it was not my intention. Suppose you have to put on a life jacket. You do it over your head. There is no other way. The same goes for my example sentences. You do not do it THROUGH your head.

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    #4

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    We normally slip our arms into jackets to put them on. We do put life jackets on over our heads, but you were not talking about them in your sentences.

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    #5

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    Life jackets are just an example, and they are put on or taken off the same way that you put on or remove other clothes, namely, over your head.

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    #6

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    One of your problems is that you have two sentences in each number example, and the two "overs" are not the same.

    Modern clothing incorporates amazing inventions such as zippers and buttons. The zipper especially is a fairly recent development, and garments certainly exist that are holdovers from earlier days.

    I own a light jacket called an anorak. Anorak is an Inuit word. Inuits did not have zippers or even buttons- their coats were permanently fastened in front and they had to pull them over their heads. I also used to own a shirt that was not open all the way down the front- it had to be put on 'over my head'.

    Today, the vast majority of jackets do not have to be put on "over the head", though they certainly may be put on "over a sweater". These two 'overs' are not the same thing. It's also possible to leave a coat fastened in front and wrestle it on/off 'over ones head', though it's not very practical.

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    #7

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    Please forgive my saying so but I do not think I misunderstood the difference between "over the head" and "over a sweater".
    When talking about adding an article of clothing to what you already have on, we use "over a sweater, pullover, etc."
    When talking about putting on or taking off an article of clothing from what you already wear, we use "over the head".
    What I was interested in was whether or not it was necessary to add "over" after mentioning "putting on/taking off.

    I thought it should be said "You should put a jacket on your sweater" instead of the proper form of "You should put a jacket on over your sweater".
    Last edited by JACEK1; 10-Apr-2016 at 19:40.

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    #8

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    Well now I'm confused. You state that something is "the proper form" and then say you think it should be something else.

    I thought it should be said "You should put a jacket on your sweater" instead of the proper form of "You should put a jacket on over your sweater".


    You cannot put a jacket "on your sweater".

    You can put a pin on your sweater, you can have a stain on your sweater, but a jacket would be put on over a sweater as a next layer, just as one typically puts on a sweater over some previous layer of clothing, such as a shirt.

    Most sweaters are put on over the head.

    Most jackets are not put on over the head.

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    #9

    Re: put on/take off/remove/slip on/off over the sweate/head-order&always followed by

    I could not agree more.

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