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    #1

    "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    Dear Mrs. Kindhart (or Martha):
    Will you lunch with me on Monday the tenth at half after one o’clock?
    Hoping so much to see you,
    Sincerely (or affectionately),
    Jane Toplofty.
    http://www.bartleby.com/95/16.html

    Anonymous:
    "Half after six o'clock" or better- "half after six o'clock in the evening" is an old-fashioned form of soctal usage for formal invitations. In fact I just this afternoon picked up from an engraver social invitations that read "at half after seven o"clock in the evening". Very proper.

    But setting aside the etiquette of formal social invitations as fairly non-germane to the question, I personally use "half past six" and "half after six" interchangeably in ordinary conversation, and hear others speak equally interchangeably.

    I might imagine the usage in both instances is descended in some way from the "half six" usage in Great Britain.

    https://www.englishforums.com/Englis...mvwzh/post.htm

    Do native speakers of American English agree with the sentence in red?
    Last edited by sitifan; 12-Apr-2016 at 18:18.
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    I rarely say "half past" and have never said or heard "half after." "Six thirty" is how I would normally say it.

    I'm much more likely to use "quarter after" or "quarter till" than I am "half past."

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    #3

    Re: "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    No. I can't speak for all of the several hundred million AmE speakers, but I'm pretty confident that very few of them would say half after six in conversation. It may appear on formal wedding invitations, but such usage has little to do with English as used every day by Americans.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    I frequently use 'half past', although I don't think I've ever used 'half after'.

    However, as Dave mentioned, with the quarter hours, 'after' and 'past' are more common.

    I probably use 'after' and 'past' almost equally when referring to the quarter hour. With the half hour however, I never use 'after'.

    I can't explain the discrepancy, but that's just the way I use them.
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    #5

    Re: "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    I know a lady from Portland, Oregon who uses "half after" but doesn't use "o'clock" with it. She just says "Half after one/three/six etc".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    I too use a quarter after or past. I use past when I include the hour: It's a quarter past five but I'll see you at a quarter after or past. It would not occur to me to say it's half after five.

    I'd advise non-native Anglophones to use past​ in every case, though I don't think after would be misunderstood.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "half after six" Need American English speakers' help!

    My thoughts have not changed since this thread, which you'll note was linked on the English Forums thread:
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/163344-It-is-half-after-past-3

    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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