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    #1

    hard fate

    Quoted from West with the night by Beryl Markham.

    Author was a pilot in Africa at early the 20th century. She wrote about fencing a aerodrome to keep animals out.

    "A high wire fence surrounds the aerodrome — a wire fence and then a deep ditch. ... They [animals] are well out of it, for themselves and for me. It would be a hard fate to go down in the memory of one’s friends as having been tripped up by a wandering zebra."

    May I read "hard fate" as "sorrowful" or "painful"? In other word, the one's friends (pilot's friends) are sorrowful when recall that accident?

    Thanks Teachers/Members!
    Last edited by Sukhomvit; 13-Apr-2016 at 03:59.

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    #2

    Re: hard fate

    Since the aerodrome has a high fence and a deep ditch to keep out animals, it is extremely unlilkely to encounter animals.
    "Hard fate" means hard luck. One has to be extremely unlucky to encounter a wondering zebra on the aerodrome grounds.
    I am not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: hard fate

    Quote Originally Posted by Sukhomvit View Post
    Quoted from West With the Night by Beryl Markham.

    The author was a pilot in Africa at in the early the 20th century. She wrote about fencing off an aerodrome to keep animals out.

    "A high wire fence surrounds the aerodrome — a wire fence and then a deep ditch. ... They [animals] are well out of it, for themselves and for me. It would be a hard fate to go down in the memory of one’s friends as having been tripped up by a wandering zebra."

    May I read "hard fate" as "sorrowful" or "painful"? In other words, the one's person's friends (the pilot's friends) are sorrowful when they recall that accident?

    Thanks teachers/members!
    Note my corrections above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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