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    #1

    sleep with

    Little Johnny can't sleep without his nanny Martha. So during bed time, Martha always lies down with Johnny and goes to sleep too.

    Which is the correct and most natural way to describe it?

    Martha is sleeping with Johnny.
    Martha is putting Johnny to sleep.
    Martha is putting Johnny to bed.
    Martha is tucking in with Johnny.
    Martha is on the bed with Johnny.
    Martha is keeping Johnny company while he sleeps.
    Not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: sleep with

    I'd simplify the whole thing to "Johnny can sleep only [when he's] next to Martha".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: sleep with

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'd simplify the whole thing to "Johnny can sleep only [when he's] next to Martha".
    Sorry I didn't make myself clear. I'd like the sentence to answer the question "Where is Martha?" or "What is Martha doing?".
    Not a teacher.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sleep with

    "She is putting Johnny to bed."
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #5

    Re: sleep with

    Martha is putting Johnny to sleep.
    Martha is putting Johnny to bed.
    Martha is tucking in with Johnny.
    These are natural enough sentences, but they do not describe the situation.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: sleep with

    "Martha is lying down with Johnny until he falls asleep."

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    #7

    Re: sleep with

    To sleep with can mean "to have sexual relations with", so the phrase should be avoided when referring to another person. It's OK to say Little Johnny always sleeps with his teddy bear, but I would discourage saying he sleeps with his nanny or, worse, that his nanny sleeps with him.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: sleep with

    Quote Originally Posted by curiousmarcus View Post


    • Martha is sleeping with Johnny. -- Suggests they are having sex.
    • Martha is putting Johnny to sleep. -- Suggests euthanasia. We put out pets to sleep when they are too sick to live without pain.
    • Martha is putting Johnny to bed. -- This is getting him ready for bed, tucking him in, reading a story, etc.. This is a common thing to say, but, as said above, is not your situation.
    • Martha is tucking in with Johnny. --No.
    • Martha is on the bed with Johnny. -- Perhaps, but he is "in" bed and she is perhaps lying on top of the covers? This says they are both on top of the covers.
    • Martha is keeping Johnny company while he sleeps. -- Not really. He is in the process of getting to sleep, not sleeping, and you don't keep someone company once they are asleep.


    My thoughts on what your originals mean.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #9

    Re: sleep with

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    [/LIST]

    My thoughts on what your originals mean.
    Thank you so much for this. This is exactly the response I was looking for.
    Not a teacher.

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