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    #1

    talking about traffic lights

    Me: That's a traffic light. Red means stop, yellow means slow down, and green means go.

    Son: It's green now! We can go!

    Me: Yes, it's green. But there's a car in front of us. If we go, we'll hit it. So we can't go.

    Son: There's no more car!

    Me: Very good. Now, we can go.

    The underlined phrases sound off to me. All those go's make it awkward. Any way to phrase them better?
    Not a teacher.

  1. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: talking about traffic lights

    You could say:

    Now we can move.

    (I'm not saying that's better.)

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: talking about traffic lights

    Sounds fine to me.
    Clearly the son is very young if he doesn't understand a traffic light or that going when there is a large object in front of you is a bad idea, so using repetitive vocabulary is natural.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: talking about traffic lights

    The only unnatural part is your son's "There's no more car!" That's not grammatical. Say "The car has gone" or "The car isn't there anymore".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: talking about traffic lights

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Sounds fine to me.
    Clearly the son is very young if he doesn't understand a traffic light or that going when there is a large object in front of you is a bad idea, so using repetitive vocabulary is natural.
    My son was impatient to get somewhere one day when we encountered stopped traffic in a very unusual place. He begged me to go despite the presence of a row of cars ahead. Our dialog was remarkably similar to the one in post 1.
    I am not a teacher.

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