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    #1

    10 including train fare.

    Me and a friend have had a disagreement and we are hoping you lovely people can help decide who is right.

    I have attached a screenshot to help...



    To put this in context, we were discussing a fee for Rory to clean Trevor's house. The first offer, as you can see was 5 plus the train fair to get home (which in this case was 4). The 2nd offer was 10 including train fair. This offer was accepted and it was not until after the cleaning that we realised we had crossed wires.

    He was of the opinion that '10 including train fair' meant 10 plus 4 for train fair (14 total), whereas, when writing it, I intended for it to mean 10 total (6 plus 4 train fair).

    Who is right here?

    Any help or opinions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, Trevor

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    #2

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    You are right, he's wrong. He's misunderstanding the meaning of 'including'. It means 'which includes'.

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    #3

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    You're not an English learner and didn't ask for help, but it's the habit here to point out bits of posts which could be improved. In that spirit, may I suggest that you write A friend and I have had a disagreement ?
    I am not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    Quote Originally Posted by TrevorWebb View Post
    Me and A friend and I have had a disagreement and we are hoping you lovely people can help decide who is right.

    I have attached a screenshot to help.

    (This doesn't work.)

    To put this in context, we were discussing a fee for Rory to clean Trevor's house. The first offer, as you can see, was 5 plus the train fair fare to get home (which in this case was 4). The 2nd offer was 10 including train fair fare. This offer was accepted and it was not until after the cleaning that we realised we had crossed wires.

    He was of the opinion that '10 including train fair fare' meant 10 plus 4 for train fair fare (14 total), whereas, when writing it, I intended for it to mean 10 total (6 plus 4 train fair fare).

    Who is right here?

    Any help or opinions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks. Trevor
    Please note my amendments above. I realise you are a native English speaker but that doesn't mean you don't make any mistakes (we all do!)

    - As GoesStation already pointed out, "My friend and I" is grammatically correct but "Me and a friend" isn't.
    - You spelt "fare" correctly in your title but then spelt it "fair" every time you wrote it in your post.
    - You missed the closing comma after "as you can see".
    - You used a comma instead of a full stop in the final line. "Thanks, Trevor" is what you say (write) to someone called Trevor when you are thanking him. "Thanks" is a standalone sentence in your post so should end with a full stop.

    I wouldn't expect any native speaker to misunderstand "10 including train fare" so I'm surprised this problem occurred.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I realise you are a native English speaker but that doesn't mean you don't make any mistakes (we all do!) .
    I doesnt!

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    #6

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    You are right, he's wrong. He's misunderstanding the meaning of 'including'. It means 'which includes'.
    And misunderstanding sounds awfully like trying it on to me here- it's hard to see how a native speaker would arrive at the conclusion that including means not including.

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    #7

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    Thank you all for your replies. I will take your grammar correction on board.

    My friend and I are still disagreeing over this. So, I am going to upload the screenshot of the actual conversation. Hopefully this will put it all into correct context.

    Also, a couple of the replies have said things like 'I do not see how anyone can misunderstand that,' but do not state the correct meaning. For the sake of this question, please treat us as complete novices and tell us clearly who you believe to be correct.

    To recap, Trevor believes the offer was 10.00 total. Rory believes the offer was for 10.00 plus the 4.00 train fare on top.

    Here is the screenshot...

    <a href="http://s1138.photobucket.com/user/Zombie_Trev/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsxa3c5apr.png.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n530/Zombie_Trev/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsxa3c5apr.png" border="0" alt=" photo image_zpsxa3c5apr.png"/></a>

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    "10 including train fare" means what it says, the 10 includes the train fare. In other words, you do the job, you get 10, you pay your own train fare.
    Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.

    Arthur Schopenhauer

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    Your screenshot doesn't work. You'll have to type it out in full, I'm afraid.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: 10 including train fare.

    http://s1138.photobucket.com/user/Zo...c5apr.png.html

    You first offer 5 plus train.
    Then you offer 10 including train.
    There is no room for misunderstanding.
    If the train fare is 4, then you only increased your offer by 1, but he accepted and that's that.

    Still hardly worth losing a friend over. Give him the 5 and then never, ever make a business deal with him again.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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