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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    a huge current of water flowing from north to south.

    Hurricanes occur in cycles every few decades, the last intense period in the U.S. being from 1940 to 1969. 'Camille', a Category 5 hurricane of such catastrophic force that it caused over a billion and a half dollars worth of damage at the time and killed 256 people, struck the coast of the Gulf of Mexico in 1969 with winds over 320 km/h. Yet, for the last quarter century, hurricane activity has been relatively mild. Only recently has hurricane activity become more intense.Scientists do not know the precise reason for the cycles of hurricane activity, but they could be caused by a phenomenon called the 'Atlantic Conveyor'. This is the name given to the gigantic current of water that flows cold from the top of the globe slowly along the Atlantic ocean floor to Antarctica and resurfaces decades later before flowing back north, absorbing heat as it crosses the equator. Since hurricanes derive their energy from the heat of warm water, it is thought that an increase in the speed of the' Conveyor', as it pulls warm water to the north, is an indicator of intensifying hurricane activity.

    Q7 .....the 'Atlantic Conveyor'... is a huge current of water flowing from north to south.

    Does "the top of the globe" imply "the surface of the the ocean" or "the arctic"? If Q7 is correct, which shows "north", it seems to mean "the arctic", but "resurface" seems to mean that it comes from the bottom of the ocean, contradicting "north to south".

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    #2

    Re: a huge current of water flowing from north to south.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Does "the top of the globe" imply "the surface of the the ocean" or "the arctic"?
    It means the North Pole.
    I am not a teacher.

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