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    #1

    Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    Hullabaloo is referred to a state of clamor or commotion when you have a lot of people around. So it is used for any clamorous activity. The word we use in Urdu is "ہلا گلا" when I transliterate it into Roman Urdu it is written as "halagula" and when I translate this word into English it becomes "Hullabaloo"

    "Halagula" is the English pronunciation of the Urdu word "ہلا گلا".
    Whereas "Hullabaloo" is its English translation.

    Now both the words from two different languages sound so similar when they are pronounced in their own languages.

    Now in Urdu we use "halagula" in two senses.

    Now, in Urdu, if I say "We will do hallagulla at the wedding or when we go out on a picnic." It means we will enjoy ourselves by playing loud music, by singing, dancing or blowing whistles. Because playing loud music, singing and blowing whistles are all parts of a noisy activity that we will do for fun.

    Secondly, it is also used in a different type of a situation like suppose something wrong has happened and people began shouting and stampeding and panicking, because of an earthquake, bomb blast or any other undesirable event. We would say in Urdu that "A bomb blast has caused a lot of 'halagula', people started running here and there".

    So tell me if you people use the English word "Hullabaloo" in your versions of English. And is it natural to use it or do you people use some other word to refer to these two types of situations.

    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    It is or was used in BrE. I haven't heard it for some years, though, and I don't know how common it is these days.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    It appears to be dying - Ngram.

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    #4

    Re: Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    The word hullabaloo is not unknown in AmE but it has a narrower range of meanings than what you describe for its Urdu equivalent. It's used only to describe a social clamor in response to an unfavorable or controversial event: North Carolina legislators didn't expect the law's passage to create such a hullabaloo.

    It's not used often in casual English.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    I don't think I've heard it in everyday speech for decades. The only example of it I've stumbled across in the last few years is as the name of a local amateur singing group. I went to one rehearsal with them and I can confirm that it was aptly named!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    I have just thought of it's equivalent in English especially for the first example I gave where it is used positively.

    It is hustle and bustle. And it is more common nowadays in English. I haven't heard of Hullabaloo either but I read it in different dictionaries, It it does sound unnatural to me. But since it rhythms with its Urdu equivalent Halagula that's why I thought I should bring it up on this forum to get your expert opinion.

    As we can say "There was much hustle and bustle on the street a night before Christmas".
    (Since the street was crowded by people who were out shopping and some of them were giving the final touches to Christmas preparations).

    We also use "رونق" or "Ronaq" in Roman Urdu to refer to hustle and bustle in English, the cheerful lively activity, or mirth.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Do you use "hullabaloo" in your version of English?

    "Hullabaloo" doesn't rhyme with "halagula" (of course, I'm simply pronouncing the latter phonetically as it's a foreign word for me).

    There might be hustle and bustle in the shopping streets around Christmas but hustle and bustle has nothing to do with cheerful, lively activity or mirth. It simply means that the shopping streets were crowded with people, all of whom were busy with their activities.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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