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  1. tahasozgen's Avatar
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    #1

    Neither could anyone else

    Hi There;
    I can not understand the sentence "Neither could anyone else". The paragraph below has been taken from the Economist, it denotes a Republican debate of presidency of the USA. Competing candidates are Mr Donald Trump and Mr Ted Cruz. Here is the context:


    Perhaps concerned for her channel’s ratings, CNN’s moderator asked Mr Cruz: “Did you just compare Donald Trump to Hillary Clinton?” “I’ll let Donald speak for himself,” Mr Cruz tamely replied. “I cannot believe how civil it’s been up here,” Mr Trump observed.

    Neither could anyone else. It felt as if, between the candidates, there must have been some sort of deal, to use Mr Trump’s favourite expression. (A word cloud of the evening might reveal that his top usages were “deal” and “many”, the latter with reference to his Israeli friends, his Cuban friends, and the properties he owns in Florida.)
    Last edited by tahasozgen; 18-Apr-2016 at 12:16.

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    #2

    Re: Neither could anyone else

    Nobody else could believe how friendly the discussion had been. Such political meetings commonly become fiercely acrimonious.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Neither could anyone else

    Neither could anyone else believe how civil it had been.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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