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    #1

    to get in on the action/act

    1. We decided to get in on the action and started selling rubber duck toys at our shop. (Ivy)
    2. We decided to get in on the act and started selling rubber duck toys at our shop.

    →Are they both correct? Is there any difference between the phrases of “get in on the action” and “get in on the act”? Thanks!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to get in on the action/act

    There is no difference in meaning.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 24-Apr-2016 at 13:05. Reason: fixing typo.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: to get in on the action/act

    They mean the same to me, too.

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    #4

    Re: to get in on the action/act

    Only the first seems natural to me in AmE.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to get in on the action/act

    There's a potential difference between the phrases, as there is in most sentences that use different words. However, in your example, they mean the same because you have defined what the act/action is.

    Let's say a mafia family is extorting money from businesses for protection. If a bent cop wants money, he's more likely to want to "get in on the action" than "on the act". I agree with GS that "action" is more common.

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