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    #1

    to infititive question

    Hello~

    Please help me understand the following sentence:

    "Everyone pitches in to do their share to help one another."

    There are two to-infinitive phrases. Please verify these with noun, adjecrive or adverb?

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    #2

    Re: to infititive question

    I am not sure what you mean by asking for verification, but the sentence if fine. If you want to break them up a bit, you could use in order to with either of the verbs.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to infititive question

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisyjpark View Post
    Please verify these with noun, adjective or adverb?
    I don't understand this question. What are you asking for?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: to infititive question

    Everyone pitches in in other to do their share in other to help one another.
    Is this ok?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to infititive question

    No, it's not. It's not at all clear what you want to say.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to infititive question

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisyjpark View Post
    Everyone pitches in in order to do their share in order to help one another.
    Is this ok?
    No, it's terrible (in my opinion). One "in order to" might be acceptable. There's nothing wrong with your original.
    ems was asking you what you mean by "Please verify these with noun, adjective or adverb?" It's unnecessary to parse your sentence, or to use adjectives and adverbs in order to verify that you may use two consecutive to-infinitive phrases.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to infititive question

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisyjpark View Post
    Everyone pitches in in order to do their share in order to help one another.
    Is this ok?
    The sentence is wrong. Everyone is singular and their is plural. Try:

    - People all pitch in to do their share to help one another.
    - We all pitch in to do our share to help one another.

    Meanwhile, there's nothing wrong with cascading infinitives. We go to work to earn the money to buy the food to get the strength to go to work to. . . .
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #8

    Re: to infititive question

    I think many editors would accept everyone pitches in to do their share. It's an example of the very useful singular their,​ as used by Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, and many other luminaries.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #9

    Re: to infititive question

    Although the thought is clear, the sentence doesn't have a lot of sense. As Charlie Bernstein says, cascading infinitives are fine, but for me they don't work here.

    First, it sounds superfluous to say, People pitch in (in order) to do their share. Isn't that what pitching in means?

    Second, it sounds superfluous to say People do their share (in order) to help one another. Isn't that what doing one's share means?

  5. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: to infititive question

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I think many editors would accept everyone pitches in to do their share. It's an example of the very useful singular their,​ as used by Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, and many other luminaries.
    Good point, thanks. My local newspaper certainly does! But it's managed by idiots.

    Anyhow, point taken. Scratch "editors" and add "sticklers"!

    In creative writing, anything goes. In formal writing, it's good to be careful. I've looked in several grammar books, and I can't find a defense of the singular "their" anywhere. (Online references, maybe, but not print.)

    It's not a moral issue. "You" can be singular and plural, so why not "their"? But as of today, as far as I can tell, grammatical it ain't!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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