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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    cousin sister

    One of the most influential people in my life is my cousin sister.
    =========================================
    In a hierarchical society of Korea, appellation is quite complicated. So we have a complicated term such as "cousin older sister", but in English, they don't have it. So do you just say "cousin" or "female cousin" without "older or younger"?

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    #2

    Re: cousin sister

    English has less-detailed relationship terms than some languages. If you want to specify the relationship with more detail, you have to spell it out: She's my cousin. Specifically, she's my father's youngest sister's second daughter.

    Didn't you ask the same question just a few days ago?
    I am not a teacher.

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: cousin sister

    Yes, but I was still unsure. I think just "cousin" is enough without referring to "male" or "female". But I wonder if English speakers are curious about the gender of relatives, while Koreans are.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: cousin sister

    As soon as you say "she" in the next sentence, your reader will know.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: cousin sister

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Yes, but I was still unsure. I think just "cousin" is enough without referring to "male" or "female". But I wonder if English speakers are curious about the gender of relatives, while Koreans are.
    Anglophones may be curious about that, certainly. If your cousin's gender is a matter of interest, you'd refer to him or her with the appropriate pronoun in another phrase. ​I visited my cousin in Beverly Hills. She's an insufferable snob.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: cousin sister

    In Indian (South Asian) English "cousin brother" and "cousin sister" are commonly used. Indian English is a recognised variant of the language.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  5. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: cousin sister

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Indian English is a recognised variant of the language.
    It is indeed. However, learners in this forum need to be aware that in 'international' or 'world' English, It's the British/North American/Australian varieties that are generally accepted as norms.

    I would not presume to correct the language of a speaker of Indian English in certain parts of the world, but some aspects of IndE vocabulary, grammar and/or cultural givens can mark speakers/writers as outsiders in the international business community.
    Last edited by Piscean; 25-Apr-2016 at 21:29. Reason: tpo

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