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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
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      • Thailand
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      • Thailand

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    • Posts: 78
    #1

    Out of that

    I am reading Academy Street by Mary Costello.

    Tess is a little girl. Her mother was dead. Everyone has gone to the graveyard and they asked Tess to stay home because she is too small to go there. At home, Tess starts to grow afraid. She heard the upstair floorboards are creaking. Tess then runs out into the yard and met her uncle - Mike. She said: "I think Momma is coming down the stairs, Mike, I think she’s back. I heard her steps.’
    Mike then said: "Come on in now out of that, and make me some tea. My belly’s above in my back"

    Dear Teachers and Members, regarding "Come on in now out of that", May I break like that "Come on in / now / out of that" and read it as "let's get in / now / out of that"

    If so, what is meaning of "out of that". Does it mean 'Forget it'? or 'let get out of that'?
    By the way, I could not fine the idiom of 'belly is above in my back'. Please help me out if possible.

    Thanks for your help!
    Last edited by Sukhomvit; 27-Apr-2016 at 03:57.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Out of that

    This is Irish English. "Come/get out of that" means "stop it". "My belly's above in my back" means "I'm so hungry that my belly has shrunk back to my spine".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

    • Member Info
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    • Posts: 78
    #3

    Re: Out of that

    Thanks Bhaisahab. If so, the whole sentence "Come on in now out of that" is equal to "Get in now and stop it"?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
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    • Posts: 25,626
    #4

    Re: Out of that

    Yes.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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