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    #1

    was taken / has taken

    "The company needed financing. In a first round in the beginning of 2000 some "business angels" came in, a big step was taken later in 2000..."

    In this sentence, "was taken" was used because the author specified the time, "later in 2000". But if we don't know about the time, we should say "a big step has taken"...

    Is my thinking right?

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: was taken / has taken

    No. The present perfect would be appropriate only if the step was taken in the fairly recent past and its consequences are still clearly relevant today.

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    #3

    Re: was taken / has taken

    The present perfect would be a big step has been taken.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: was taken / has taken

    Indeed. I missed that completely.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: was taken / has taken

    The wording is good. I'd put a comma after 2000, because it's a dependent clause.

    Unless the full sentence is a longer series of events, I'd either put a period after came in or put an and after it.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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