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    #1

    She had lain

    Would you take a look at my sentence and correct my mistakes?

    She had lain on her bed for hours before sleep overcame her.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: She had lain

    It's OK. I'd say She'd been lying ...

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: She had lain

    I agree with Piscean.

    In conversational American English, we generally prefer had been lying to had lain. But both are perfectly good.

    This is a good word to look up. The forms of lay and lie even confuse native speakers:
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 27-Apr-2016 at 22:14.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #4

    Re: She had lain

    Also be aware that to lay someone, usually a man, can mean to have sexual intercourse with him. For that reason, you should avoid lay, laid and lain​ unless you're totally confident in their use.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: She had lain

    'Lsy' in that sense requires an object. I see no reason at all to avoid intransitive lay',

    Nor would I avoid talking of chickens laying eggs or my laying the table because some pubescent schoolboy might snigger.

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    #6

    Re: She had lain

    I didn't discourage using lay, laid and lain altogether. I just warned of potential pitfalls.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: She had lain

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    The forms of lay and lie even confuse native speakers:
    HOW TO USE LAY AND LIE

    I'm lying here upon the shore;
    I lie here every day.
    I've lain here many times before;
    I lay here yesterday.

    I'd lay my head upon the floor
    If you'd lie down by me.
    I've laid it there five times or more;
    (I lied - it's only three).

    KE
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 28-Apr-2016 at 12:28.

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