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    #1

    from that day vs of that day

    is the sentence "I wish I could erase all of the memory from that day." grammatically incorrect?

    So I live in Korea and we had midterms recently and I wrote that sentence on my English test. I had to translate Korean into English and the answer was "I wish I could erase all my memory of that day."

    I lost two points because I wrote from that day instead of the of that day. Is there any difference between the two? Is there any way that I could get those two points back?

    also my teacher says that "Memory from that day" means all memories since that day, whereas the Korean sentence meant "all the memories made that day." Is that true? Doesn't "memory from that day on" mean memories made since that day?

    I really want to get those two points back - is there any way I can?

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    #2

    Re: from that day vs of that day (URGENT)

    Of that day is the form I would use, because what you want to forget is what happened that day. From that day suggests that your memory belongs to that day, rather than it is what you remember. Losing two marks seems a bit harsh, but I would use the form suggested as the correct answer.

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    #3

    Re: from that day vs of that day (URGENT)

    The two prepositions can often overlap but there are differences in use/meaning.

    • you have a memory of something

    The 'something' is the object of your memory. You don't have a memory from something. We wouldn't say I have fond memories from my grandfather.

    But you can have memories from a time/place:

    • I don't have many memories from 2004.

    In this example, 2004 is the time/place where the memories come from. It's like the memories are present images that have come from a past time.

    So if you use of something, you're saying the something is the object of memory and if you use from something, you're saying the something is the origin of a memory.

    Now, in your original post, the 'something' is "that day", which could be interpreted as both an object of memory (your teacher's POV) and/or a time of origin (your POV). You will have to argue this with your teacher.

    However, I would have to say that I think your teacher's argument is stronger because of the phrase "all of the memory". If it was "all of the memories", I think you would have a much better case.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: from that day vs of that day

    Quote Originally Posted by gracekim027 View Post
    Is [Capitalize the first word of every sentence - ALWAYS!] the sentence "I wish I could erase all of the memories from that day." grammatically incorrect? ["All" indicates more than one, so "memories" is plural.]

    I [Starting a sentence with "So" is common but usually wrong.] live in Korea, [Use commas to separate the parts of compound sentences.] [Don't use "and" until the last item of a series.] we had midterms recently, [Again, the comma separates compound sentences.] and I wrote that sentence on my English test. I had to translate Korean into English, [This is another compound sentence.] and the answer was, "I wish I could erase all my memories of that day."

    I lost two points because I wrote "from that day" instead of "of that day." Is there any difference between the two? Yes.

    Is there any way that I could get those two points back? I don't know.

    Also, my teacher says that "Memories from that day" means all memories since that day, whereas the Korean sentence meant "all the memories made that day." Is that true? Doesn't "memory from that day on" mean memories made since that day?

    "From" can mean either.

    To say "since that day" more clearly using "from," you might use:

    - "from that day forward"
    - "that come from that day"
    - "from that day until today"

    "Of that day" means "only on that day." If that's your meaning, then "of" is more clear.


    I really want to get those two points back. Is there any way I can? I can't answer that. Your teacher can.
    Does that help?
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: from that day vs of that day

    You could also say:

    I wish I could erase all memory of that day.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: from that day vs of that day

    Say:

    Can I get those two points back?

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