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    #1

    on the site/at the site

    When we refer to a construction site where construction work is under way. We normally use the preposition "on", and normally when this phrase appears elsewhere on the internet or in books and at any other place, I have always noticed that it is always "on the site" not "at the site".

    Now, when we are talking about the activities (they may be construction activities or any other activities) that are going on on the site of construction. And I am using either one of these phrases "the activities goes on" or "the activities are going on" with the phrase "on the site" and now if I join them together there will be two "ons"

    Here are the examples.

    The activities goes on on the site.
    The activities are going on on the site.

    So doesn't it look or sound weird to use two ONs?
    Can't we resort to using "at" in this particular situation to avoid double ONs?

    The activities goes on at the site.
    The activities are going on at the site.


    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: on the site/at the site

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    When we refer to a construction site where construction work is under way​, we normally use the preposition "on", and normally when this phrase appears elsewhere on the internet, or in books and at any other place, anywhere else, I have always noticed that it is always "on the site" not "at the site".

    Now, when we are if I am talking about the activities (they may be construction activities or any other activities) that are going on on the site of construction and I am using use either one of these phrases - "the activities goes on" or "the activities are going on" with the phrase "on the site" and now if I join them together, there will be two "ons".

    Here are the examples.

    The activities goes on on the site.
    The activities are going on on the site.

    So doesn't it look or sound weird to use two ONs?
    Can't we resort to using "at" in this particular situation to avoid double ONs?

    The activities goes on at the site.
    The activities are going on at the site.


    Regards
    Aamir the Global Citizen
    Note my corrections above.

    The first example in both is wrong because you have used "The activities" (plural) followed by "goes" (third person singular).

    There's nothing wrong with two "on"s in one sentence, provided they are the correct preposition in each case.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: on the site/at the site

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    When we refer to a construction site where construction work is under way, we normally use the preposition "on", and normally when this phrase appears elsewhere on the internet or in books and at any other place, I have always noticed that it is always "on the site", not "at the site". Either is fine. You can also say "on-site."

    Now, when we are talking about the activities (they may be construction activities or any other activities) that are going on on the site of construction. And I am using either one of these phrases "the activities go on" or "the activities are going on" with the phrase "on the site",and now if I join them together there will be two "ons". Yes.Here are the examples.

    The activities go
    on on the site.
    The activities are going on on the site.

    So doesn't it look or sound weird to use two ONs? Yes, but English often looks weird - even to us.
    Can't we resort to using "at" in this particular situation to avoid double ONs? Yes, that would be good.
    The activities go on at the site.
    The activities are going on at the site.


    Regards,
    Aamir the Global Citizen
    Good question!

    It's like "We'll be in in an hour," or "It was over over a day ago," or "I knew what she was after after I talked with her teacher," or "I knew that that was coming."

    We sometimes repeat words. It still sounds natural.

    Those are all grammatical examples. A mistake a lot of Americans make in conversation is saying "is" twice: "The reality is is that we don't always think before we speak!"
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 01-May-2016 at 00:33.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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