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  1. Just Joined
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    #1

    To go over someone's house

    To go over someone's house. What it means?

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    #2

    Re: To go over someone's house

    Welcome to the forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by Desaes View Post
    To go over someone's house. What does it mean?
    Please note the correct way to ask your question.

    In what context did you read that phrase?

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    #3

    Re: To go over someone's house

    go over someone's house is an informal spoken BrE way of saying visit someone at their house.

    Also similar: come over (Come over mine at around nine.)



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    #4

    Re: To go over someone's house

    Your question in WordReference forums was titled 'To go over to someone's house'.

    Is that what you meant to ask here?

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: To go over someone's house

    Quote Originally Posted by Desaes View Post
    To go over to someone's house. What does it mean?
    To visit.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: To go over someone's house

    I'm not trying to be overly picky - is the "to" required in British English or not?

    I went over to Jon's house -- this is how we'd say it in American English.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: To go over someone's house

    The "to" isn't entirely necessary in BrE.

    I'm going over John's later.
    He went over his mum's for Sunday lunch.

    My preference is for the version with "to" though.

    There is another meaning for "to go over" - "to examine" or "to search".

    I was burgled last year. The police went over my house looking for fingerprints and other clues.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: To go over someone's house

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The "to" isn't entirely necessary in BrE.

    I'm going over John's later.
    He went over his mum's for Sunday lunch.
    Even though the dropped preposition is different, this feels similar to the BrE expression down the pub,​ meaning "at the pub."
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Piscean's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: To go over someone's house

    ... and 'to the pub'.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: To go over someone's house

    Some Americans leave out the to, but it's too informal to be called standard American English.

    When Marylanders say "going down (to) the ocean," it often sounds like "goin' danny aichin."
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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