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    #1

    Smile Beware of Quaintitude

    Sorry for too many questions today.
    Do you come up with any words similar to "quaintitude" in the context below?
    In spite of the author's explaining about "Quaintitide," it's not still clear for me. Thank you.

    ------from Le Road Trip by Vivian Swift
    Quaintitude is found in tourist attractions. It's wherever the word travel is preceded by the words luxury, family, adventure, or vacation.
    Quaintitude is the easily accessible sentimental consumer experience, a mass-marketed facsimile of a first-hand experience.
    France is low on quaintitude. That's because, as explained by Edith Wharton in her book French Ways and Their Meaning,
    "The French have never taken the trouble to disguise their Frenchness from foreigners."
    Saint-Foy-la-Grand has no quaintitude. It is a very pretty, very old town on the Dordogne River, but it hasn't bothered to put up an amusement park, heritage trail or a five-star hotel.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Beware of Quaintitude

    Quote Originally Posted by frindle2 View Post
    Sorry for so many questions today.
    Do you come up with any words similar to "quaintitude" in the context below? No.
    In spite of the author's explaining about "Quaintitide," it's not still clear for me.

    I think it's a word she invented for phony quaintness designed to attract tourists.

    Thank you.

    ------from Le Road Trip by Vivian Swift
    Quaintitude is found in tourist attractions. It's wherever the word travel is preceded by the words luxury, family, adventure, or vacation.
    Quaintitude is the easily accessible sentimental consumer experience, a mass-marketed facsimile of a first-hand experience.
    France is low on quaintitude. That's because, as explained by Edith Wharton in her book French Ways and Their Meaning,
    "The French have never taken the trouble to disguise their Frenchness from foreigners."
    Saint-Foy-la-Grand has no quaintitude. It is a very pretty, very old town on the Dordogne River, but it hasn't bothered to put up an amusement park, heritage trail or a five-star hotel.
    You're welcome!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Beware of Quaintitude

    Quote Originally Posted by frindle2 View Post
    ------from Le Road Trip by Vivian Swift
    Saint-Foy-la-Grand
    The town is Sainte-Foy-La-Grande.
    I am not a teacher

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