Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Apr 2016
    • Posts: 353
    #1

    water containers


    What do you call these? Just water containers? How do you differentiate between the two?

    Edit: Do you call the "faucet" on the first image a faucet?
    Last edited by curiousmarcus; 02-May-2016 at 08:59.
    Not a teacher.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,830
    #2

    Re: water containers

    I'd call the first one a canister. It has a tap (BrE)/faucet (AmE) at the bottom. The second is a dispenser tank for a water cooler.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,285
    #3

    Re: water containers

    I call the valve a spigot.

    The container in the bottom picture is a five-gallon jug or a carboy.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 3,571
    #4

    Re: water containers

    I call them both jugs. I call the second one a bottle.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,395
    #5

    Re: water containers

    The top one is also called a jerry can. The 2nd one I'd call a water bottle.

    The valve is called a spigot or tap. Note that in AmE although 'tap' isn't used to refer to a regular water faucet such as on a sink, we might use it here.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 9,285
    #6

    Re: water containers

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Note that in AmE although 'tap' isn't used to refer to a regular water faucet such as on a sink, we might use it here.
    In some regions and some expressions, "tap" for a water faucet is common in AmE.
    I am not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #7

    Re: water containers

    I would say that the first jug had a tap on it. "Faucet" would be associated with plumbing, like in your kitchen or bathroom sinks.

    The connection outside your house for attaching a garden hose is a spigot.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 1,741
    #8

    Re: water containers

    I'd call the top one a jerry can, with a tap.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 3,571
    #9

    Re: water containers

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    The top one is also called a jerry can. The 2nd one I'd call a water bottle.

    The valve is called a spigot or tap. Note that in AmE although 'tap' isn't used to refer to a regular water faucet such as on a sink, we might use it here.
    Yep, we usually say "faucet," but sometimes we say "tap," too.

    We say "tap water" when we're distinguishing it from spring water or bottled water (which is usually tap water once removed).
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Apr 2016
    • Posts: 353
    #10

    Re: water containers

    Wow, lots of options. After checking with Google Images, I think I'll go with carboy and jerry can with spigot.
    Not a teacher.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] There wan't any water or There weren't any water/apple
    By learnslow in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 30-Dec-2012, 03:34
  2. [Vocabulary] water proofing vs. water repellent
    By olihina in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2010, 08:54
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Aug-2009, 12:55
  4. [Idiom] stay put / tread water / keep one's head above water
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Jul-2008, 08:03
  5. cooking utensils/implements/containers
    By angliholic in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Feb-2008, 08:03

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •