Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Apr 2016
    • Posts: 353
    #1

    The fat cat ran at the rat.

    The fat cat ran at the rat.

    It's from a book, Nat's Cat.

    Is this natural? I would tend to say ​The fat cat ran after the rat.
    Not a teacher.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,968
    #2

    Re: The fat cat ran at the rat.

    If the cat was running at the rat, the rat could have been facing it. The cat was running to attack the rat.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 06-May-2016 at 19:34. Reason: Fixed typo

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Tagalog
      • Home Country:
      • Philippines
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Apr 2016
    • Posts: 353
    #3

    Re: The fat cat ran at the rat.

    Could running at somebody always be understood as with an intent to attack? The sentences I got from Fraze.it seem like it.
    Last edited by curiousmarcus; 06-May-2016 at 11:14.
    Not a teacher.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,968
    #4

    Re: The fat cat ran at the rat.

    Could run at be synonymous with running towards with an intent to attack?
    It could.

    Don't try to read too much into a sentence in a children's book that tries to use only very short monosyllabic words.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 06-May-2016 at 13:22.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,396
    #5

    Re: The fat cat ran at the rat.

    As Piscean mentioned, the purpose of the sentence is focused more on phonics and alphabetics skills, rather than grammar.

    One early step of learning to read is using rhyme and alliteration to increase phonemic awareness and decoding skills, beginning with monosyllabic words for blending practice and recognizing word families (in this sentence, the '-at' word family).

    Multi-syllabic words require a bit more competency with phonemic awareness to differentiate between the syllable division rules, so that's likely why they didn't use 'after' - plus it's a different word family.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2016, 04:03
  2. [Vocabulary] It is smart to commit to a balanced-fat diet , not to a no-fat diet.."
    By nininaz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2014, 20:05
  3. Fondle a cat or stroke a cat
    By Patrick87 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2011, 13:06
  4. [General] run to fat = get fat
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24-Feb-2010, 20:56

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •