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    #1

    Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    "Tom's father bought a new car which has the latest high-tech equipment."
    This is a sentence from my teacher's handout. But I myself expanded it to the following sentences:
    a. Tom's father bought a new car which has the latest high-tech equipment.
    b. Tom's father bought the new car which has the latest high-tech equipment.
    c. Tom's father bought a new car, which has the latest high-tech equipment.
    d. Tom's father bought the new car, which has the latest high-tech equipment.
    My question is:
    Are they all correct? What are the differences between them?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by z7655431; 10-May-2016 at 17:47.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    a. is the same as the original. c. and d. are the same.

    b., c., and d. are wrong.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #3

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    a. is the same as the original. c. and d. are the same.

    b., c., and d. are wrong.
    Sorry, d should be: "Tom's father bought the new car, which has the latest high-tech equipment."
    Is it still wrong?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Yes.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Quote Originally Posted by z7655431 View Post
    "Tom's father bought a new car which has the latest high-tech equipment."
    This is a sentence from my teacher's handout. But I expanded it to the following sentences:

    a. Tom's father bought a new car which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    You're saying that (a) his car has the latest equipment and (b) there are other cars that also have the latest equipment.

    In American English, we would say "that," not "which."

    b. Tom's father bought the new car which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    You're saying that (a) his car has the latest equipment and (b) it's the only car with the latest equipment.

    Again, in American English, we would say "that."

    c. Tom's father bought a new car, which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Not good. You're sort of saying that all new cars have the latest equipment, which isn't what you mean. And worse, you're saying it ungrammatically.


    d. Tom's father bought the new car, which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    You're (a) specifying what particular car he bought and (b) giving us the added information that it has the latest equipment.

    My questions are:

    Are they all correct? What are the differences among them? [Or more simply: What are the differences?]

    See the notes above.


    Thanks!
    You're welcome!
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Quote Originally Posted by z7655431 View Post
    What are the differences between them?
    That is correct. What are the differences among them? is not correct in BrE.

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    #7

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    That is correct. What are the differences among them? is not correct in BrE.
    It's odd in AmE too, though I wouldn't label it as incorrect. Some people see -tween in between and relate it to the root it shares with "two". From this they derive the "rule" that between can only be used when relating two items. This rule does apply in certain contexts, but the sentence in question isn't one of them.

    There's a good explanation of the false etymology and the long-attested use of between for multiple items here. The last paragraph describes the situation we're discussing.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Tom's father bought a/the new car(,) which has the latest high-tech equipment.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It's odd in AmE too, though I wouldn't label it as incorrect. Some people see -tween in between and relate it to the root it shares with "two". From this they derive the "rule" that between can only be used when relating two items. This rule does apply in certain contexts, but the sentence in question isn't one of them.

    There's a good explanation of the false etymology and the long-attested use of between for multiple items here. The last paragraph describes the situation we're discussing.
    Thanks, GS. I sit corrected. My English teachers said to always use "among" for more than two people or things, but that was a long time ago.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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