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  1. #1
    majid72 is offline Member
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    cut corners VS botching

    Hello

    I'm looking for a word or an expression to mean a task which is done out of laziness, lack of interest, hastiness incompletely and in little quality. I found that cut corners could mean the same thing, what about botching? Could you think ofAny other words or idioms?

    Many thanks

  2. #2
    victorr is offline Newbie
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    Re: cut corners VS botching

    Quote Originally Posted by majid72 View Post
    Hello

    I'm looking for a word or an expression to mean a task which is done out of laziness, lack of interest, hastiness incompletely and in little quality. I found that cut corners could mean the same thing, what about botching? Could you think ofAny other words or idioms?

    Many thanks
    To half-ass something sounds good :).

  3. #3
    majid72 is offline Member
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    Re: cut corners VS botching

    Quote Originally Posted by victorr View Post
    To half-ass something sounds good :).
    1- What about " botching"? Could it fit in the following sentence like "half ass" and " cut corners"?

    A-Since I found the job so boring and I was in a hurry too, I botched my job.
    B-Since I found the job so boring and I was in a hurry too, I cut corners to finish it.
    C-Since I found the job so boring and I was in a hurry too, I did a half ass job doing it.

  4. #4
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: cut corners VS botching

    To me, 'to half-ass' something doesn't sound good. Maybe it does in Polish.

    A, B, and C have different meanings.
    To botch something means to make a complete mess of it. It's not necessary that corners be cut.
    To cut corners means to leave out some parts of the activity, not doing something properly, or do something sloppily. Sometimes the results will be OK, and sometimes they won't.
    If you do a half-assed job of something, you haven't necessarily botched it completely, but the results won't be as good as they should be.

  5. #5
    Lazz is offline Newbie
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    Re: cut corners VS botching

    Quote Originally Posted by majid72 View Post
    Hello

    I'm looking for a word or an expression to mean a task which is done out of laziness, lack of interest, hastiness incompletely and in little quality. I found that cut corners could mean the same thing, what about botching? Could you think ofAny other words or idioms?
    In the arcane terminology of traditional English manual crafts, "bodging" refers to the art of concealing a clumsy mistake. "To botch" is a derivative meaning "to mend" or "to repair" (a botcher was once the name for a cobbler or shoe-mender) but evolving useage has now lent the term its indelible association with the clumsiness and ineptitude of the original mistake (whereas bodging, its root, the art of rendering that mistake imperceptible, clearly demands enormous skill).

    But the original mistake, or botch, does not need to be the result of laziness or indifference or haste.
    (Although indeed it might be)

    "To cut corners" is to attempt a reduction of cost in terms of time and/or money. Neither laziness nor lack of interest are necessary for this, although haste and incompleteness may be the unavoidable result.

    So neither expression meets your description adequately enough.

    If I wished to indicate that a task had been performed lazily, without due attention, in a rush, or incompletely, I think I would simply call it "careless".

  6. #6
    fencecat42 is offline Newbie
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    Re: cut corners VS botching

    I am not a teacher.

    A common phrase that you could use is "phone it in." This means that you did not give your best effort. It implies laziness and lack of interest in the task.

    "Since I found the job so boring and I was in a hurry too, I phoned it in."

    The phrase comes from the idea that important business is conducted in person, while less important business may be conducted over the telephone.

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